Unusual music but very entertaining

Discussion in 'TM Lounge' started by rjzeller, Jun 4, 2005.

  1. rjzeller

    rjzeller Forte User

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    Mar 7, 2005
    Rochester, MN
    All hail La Bottine Souriante and their album "Chic & Swell"!!!

    I just got my copy today and my feet haven't stopped tapping yet. La Ziguezon is just a feet tapping party! I mean it, this music is AWESOME.

    Well...that is...if you're into French-Canadian-Celtic music. I haven't the damnedest idea what on earth they're saying, but I like it!

    Anyone else got reccomendations on unusual or strang music that is very catchy or enjoyable (P.D.Q. Bach and Hooked on Classics does not count)?

    anyone here speak French and want to translate for me?
     
  2. jpkaminga

    jpkaminga Pianissimo User

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    Jul 1, 2004
    Boston
    I speak french pretty well, however the accent of french-canadians is almost impossible to understand, but if you had the written lyrics I could proly do a pretty good translation
     
  3. Tootsall

    Tootsall Fortissimo User

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    Oct 25, 2003
    Yee HAW!
    That's certainly a fact! It's a whole different language from Parisian French.
     
  4. rjzeller

    rjzeller Forte User

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    ....dang filters. The *** is actually "t .. i ... t", gues that little bit of prose is an unacceptable slang on this end of the border....

    Okay, here are the lyrics to "Le Ziguezon", I assume the first bit is just some information on the song since I can't match it to any of the singing...

    ***

    Il existe une foule de facons de chanter cette chanson avec des refrains tout aussi deroutants les uns que les autres. Celle-ci nous vient de Normand Miron, tres bon chanteur mais aussi exellent accordeoniste. Depuis longtemps deja, La Bottine chante cette chanson sur scene. Aussi, avons-nous decide, quoique difficile a interpreter dans un studio, de la mettre sur ce disque.

    M'en va a la fontaine
    Pour y pecher du poisson (bis)
    La ziguezon zin zon
    La fontaine est profonde
    Me suis coule au fond

    Regrain
    Ziguezon zin zon, fille en haut
    Fille en bas, fille fille fille-femme
    Femme, femme, femme, aussi pis la
    Bottine-tine-tine le rigolet ha ha
    Son p'tit porte-cle tout rouille, tout rouille
    Son p'tit porte-cle tout rouille gaiement (bis)
    La fontaine est profonde
    Me suis coule au fond
    Par icit il y passe
    Trois cavaliers barons

    Refrain
    Par icit il y passe
    Trois cavaliers barons
    Que m'donneriez vous belle
    Si j'vous tirais du fond

    Refrain

    Que m'donneriez vous belle
    Si j'vous tirais du fond
    Tirez, tirez dit-elle
    Apres ca nous verrons

    Refrain

    Tirez, tirez dit-elle
    Apres ca nous verrons
    Quand la belle fut a terre
    Se sauve a la maison

    Refrain

    Quand la belle fut a terre
    Se sauve a la maison
    S'assoit a la fenetre
    Compose une chanson

    Refrain

    S'assoit a la fenetre
    Compose une chanson
    Mon petit coeur en gage
    N'est pas pour un baron

    Refrain

    Mon petit coeur en gage
    N'est pas pour un baron
    Mais pour un homme de guerre
    Qui a du poil au menton

    Refrain

    ***

    There it is. The repetitive pattern is interesting, wondering what this all translates into. The song is basically a call-echo where a soloist sings and there's a response from the ensemble.
     
  5. jpkaminga

    jpkaminga Pianissimo User

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    Jul 1, 2004
    Boston
    there exists a crowd(bunch?) of ways to sing this song with each refrain as disconcerting as the next. This one comes to us from Normand Miron, a very good singer and just as good accordeonist. It's already been a long time, The Boot sings this song on stage. Also, we have decided, although it was difficult to interpret in the studio, to put it on this CD.

    I take myself to the fountain
    to fish for some fish
    the ziguezon zin zon (I have no idea, I'm pretty sure the zin zon is onomatopoeia)
    the fountain is deep
    I've slipped in the fountain

    ziguezon zin zon, girl up high
    girl down low, girl girl girl-woman
    woman woman woman even worse there
    boot oot oot the joke ha ha
    make a sound with the little keyring around around
    sound the little keyring around happily
    the fountain is deep
    I've slipped to the bottom of the fountain
    by here there passes
    three baron knights

    by here there passes
    three baron knights
    who give me to your beautiful self
    if I pull you to the bottom

    who give me to your beautiful self
    if I pull you to the bottom
    pull, pull she says
    after this we go

    pull pull she says
    after this we go
    when beauty has fled to earth (weird construction, might be a quebec thing, I think it might mean 'has fled from')
    it saves itself in the house

    when beauty has fled to earth
    it saves itself in the house
    sits itself in the window
    composes a song

    sits itself in the window
    composes a song
    my little heart in gage(no idea)
    is not for a baron

    my little heart in gage
    is not for a baron'
    but for a man of war
    who has hair on his chest
     
  6. Tootsall

    Tootsall Fortissimo User

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    Oct 25, 2003
    Yee HAW!
    Pretty good try, JP... and probably with as much validity as the interpretation I put on it.

    Quote:
    There are a number of ways of singing this song with refrains that can go one way or the other. This one comes us from Norman Miron, very good singer but also exellent accordeonist. This song has been sung at La Bottine (“The Bootâ€.. a common name for small bistro/pub with entertainment) for some time. We have decided to record this song.


    Going to the fountain to catch some fish
    La ziguezon zin zon
    The fountain is deep
    Pours me to the bottom

    Refrain:
    Ziguezon zin zon, Girl on top
    Girl in bottom, girl girl girl-woman
    Woman, woman, woman, also worse
    Bottine-tine-tine le rigolet ha ha
    His little door key is rusted, rusted
    His little door key is merrily rusted
    The fountain is deep
    Pours me to the bottom
    Passing by here
    Three cavalier barons

    Refrain
    Three cavalier barons
    Three cavalier barons
    Who gave to me your beauty
    If I lose you


    Refrain

    Who gave to me your beauty
    If I take you to the bottom
    Row, row she said
    After that we shall see

    Refrain

    Row, row she said
    After that we shall see
    When the beautiful one comes to shore
    And runs away from the house

    Refrain

    When the beautiful one comes to shore
    And runs away from the house
    To try at the window
    Write a song

    Refrain

    To try at the window
    Write a Song
    My small heart is given
    Not for a baron

    Refrain

    My small heart is given
    Not for a baron
    But for a soldier
    With a beard

    Refrain

    ***
    Unquote:

    Now.... make of that what you will! It certainly points out some of the differences between Quebecois and French. I rather suspect that it has to do with a fisherman who has lost his little heart to this girl but she seems to be rather taken by one of the three soldiers... the one with the beard.

    M'aidez, M'aidez!!! LOL.
     
  7. jpkaminga

    jpkaminga Pianissimo User

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    Jul 1, 2004
    Boston
    thanks toots, I like your version better, a little more poetic, I was trying to be pretty literal, and I was also pretty hasty, kind of embarrassing to read my translation now, I've mainly got a good accent as I was taught at an early age, buut my grammar (as it might be obvious to those who know french) is pretty lousy

    I realize I really need to brush up on my irregular verbs when I saw that you translated 'verrons' correctly, I was between 'come' and 'go' but after reading your version I realize it's definitely neither, and for some reason I though rouille meant round but hey I definitely didn't know the word for rusted anyways, and round is definitely ronde, anybody ever heard Itzhak Perlman play "La ronde des lutins", its like 'the carnival of venice' for a violin, that is it's a showpiece, the tune is different, and also I dunno how many people in the world can play 'the carnival of venice' but 'la ronde des lutins' is the kind of piece people attempt, Itzhak is one of the few who can actually play it, but I digress, there were a bunch of other mistakes in my translation but those two seemed particularly glaring, in any case toots seems to have done a much better translation, nice job toots

    as for the interpretation, i dunno, at first I thought it was a drinking song, but it definitely turns into a love song in which some girl prefers an experienced man (hair on chin) to a guy who merely looks nice (a baron, a guy with a title)
     
  8. Tootsall

    Tootsall Fortissimo User

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    Oct 25, 2003
    Yee HAW!
    Thanks for the compliments but my French really sucks for a guy who lived in France for four years as a kid and then in Montreal for four years as a sub-adult! (ie, anything under 30)

    I was basing my translation about the soldiers based more on the historical sense that the French had garrisons stationed in Quebec to protect their settlers (farmers and fishermen) from "les maudites Anglais" and had the sense that it was more about a tug-of-war between the soldiers and a "habitant" or resident (who would have been either a fisherman or farmer). Kind of a "contextual" interpretiation if you will. Anyway I'm sure that with sufficient beer on board, an absolutely correct interpretation is secondary to the foot-tapping that undoubtedly accompanies the musicians! To go back to the original post I wonder if this is the kind of folk tune that forms the basis for today's Cajun "zydeco" music. Wouldn't surprise me at all.
     
  9. Zezeye

    Zezeye New Friend

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    Dec 28, 2013
    Hi,

    I know this is an old post. But since it comes in the first result in Google search for "Ziguezon meaning", I thought it deserve an answer. I'm a French Quebecers; my English is not very good so I'll make my best to explain the song.

    First, this is a song, so it takes license with the grammar and lexical rules for the sake of poetry and tempo. Plus, it's an old song; it doesn't necessarily reflects today's language.

    Basically, the song is about a girl who sank in a fountain and is saved by three barons. They asked for a reward but she fled home, because she belongs to another man. What maybe confusing is that some part are sing by her and some not. But there is no fisherman in the song, it is the girl who go fishing.

    On another level, the song is full of veiled sexual allusion: the fountain, the girl becoming a woman, the keychain (maybe it's rusty because it has not been used...), the three barons caling her "beauty" and asking for a reward...

    At the end: "Avoir du poil au menton" = "To have some hair on the chin", is a typical quebec expression used to call a fully grown-up man. It's not an experienced man, but simply a man, compare to a prepubescent one.

    Your translation seems ok, but there is a few mistake I wish to point out :

    The refrain:
    It's a bit tricky, because the meaning in French is not very clear: "Fille en haut, fille en bas" may refer to a direction rather than an position (girl to the top, girl to the bottom) but I'm not sure at all. Maybe it refers to her sinking in the fountain (to the bottom) and then being pull out. Then she's becoming a woman (I told you about sexual allusions...). "Gaiement" can be translate as "Gaily" and is just a folk version of the "Oh yeah" in rock'n'roll music.


    I'd rather say:
    >> The fountain is deep
    I sank myself to the bottom
    Round there three barons riders pass by her

    Usually, in French we say "J'ai coulé" not "Je me suis coulé". As is, it seems like it was done on purpose.
    "Par icitte" is a joual for "Par ici";
    "il lui en passe trois cavaliers barons", the word "en" may refer to the girl, as if they where passing by her (and not by here), which is an an unusual syntax in French.

    I'd rather say:
    >> What will you give me, beauty
    If I pull you from the depth (bottom)?
    Pull, pull she says
    After that we shall see

    "Ma belle" is a name given to the girl by the three barons. They're not talking about her beauty, they're calling her "beauty".


    >> When the Beauty comes to shore
    flees home
    Sits by the window
    Write a song

    She's not running FROM the house, she's running TO her house.



    And for the end, the title... "La ziguezon", I have no idea! Probably it's just some kind of onomatopae or "turlute" particular to this song.
     

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