Upper register tonguing issues.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Mambo King, Jul 14, 2011.

  1. Mambo King

    Mambo King Pianissimo User

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    Hi all,

    I've recently been finding that my tonguing in the upper register (not extreme) has been unreliable, especially after anything longer than a half note. I'm trying to be very aware of tension and it doesn't feel as though I'm using the "no technique pressure method!" and I'm supporting OK (IMHO). I'm not aware that I'm trying to do anything different the higher up I go but obviously I am. I intend to ask a pro for a lesson or two (I'm a comeback player) but in the meantime I'd appreciate any constructive insight that anybody can offer.

    Cheers,
    MH
     
  2. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Please define "unreliable" for us.
     
  3. Mambo King

    Mambo King Pianissimo User

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    Not clean or consistant. More like "th" than "t". Sometimes nothing comes out. I don't think that I'm allowing the aperture to close up but all of my opinions on what is or is not happening must be taken with a pinch of "I'm an amateur"!
     
  4. Mambo King

    Mambo King Pianissimo User

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    FYI, my chops are fairly fleshy and I'm playing a GR 67L piece.
     
  5. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    I have been finding my upper mid register to have similar issues recently, from about A to D. Its difficult to explain, but I find opening my throat seems to help, specifically by moving my tongue forward and arching it. I'm a professional(trumpet player) by no means so with a grain of salt.
     
  6. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Try flutter-tonguing the notes, end the flutter while still holding the note tongue a few times.

    My best guess.
     
  7. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    man - I thought you would have said something about "magic bubbles",
    anyways -- I would tell the OP --- just "think" in the lower register - it is that easy, after all everyone here -- who knows --- will tell that the high register is a figment of ones imagination -- because it is just as easy as all the other registers.:thumbsup:

    I would say -- long tones in the upper register, followed by tonguing, whole notes, eighth notes, 16th, etc. --- take many breaks in between -- make sure each successive set of notes is crisp -- even if it is slow --- think about weeks for this change to take place ---- patience, persistence,
     
  8. Dave Hughes

    Dave Hughes Mezzo Forte User

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    You're moving more air in general in the upper register, so tonguing a little lighter up further toward your teeth might work. That was advice I was given a while back, because I used to fight the air and really hammer my tonguing up high.
     
  9. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    are we moving MORE air -- or are we moving air FASTER???? -- oh no -- I just started a turbulent, soon to go viral statement, or rather question, didn't I???? I am so badROFLROFL
    it all has to be coordinated with HOW we move the air -- so yes, lighter tonguing, and take the transistion slow -- in my opinion -- so it is consistent, and your embouchure (muscles, tongue, etc.) are conditioned to "remember" how to do it.:thumbsup:
     
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Wow Kingtrumpet, this is making great sense. I have to agree with this post and could not have said it any better myself (only without the emotrons... can't you make just one post without using those little guys?)
     

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