URGENT! please help, music theory...

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by NYCO10, May 7, 2010.

  1. NYCO10

    NYCO10 Pianissimo User

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    Hi guys this may seem a stupid question but i need to know what it is, any of you who are piano players will probebly know Chopin's Prelude No.15 in D flat major (Raindrop prelude) and in bar 4 there is an ornament which i refer to as a 'septuplet' but in my revision guide its reffered to as 'a turn written out in full' i i think this is wrong, could someone please shed light on this?!

    Peace NYCO10
     
  2. Solar Bell

    Solar Bell Moderator Staff Member

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  3. Pete Anderson

    Pete Anderson Pianissimo User

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    Err, what do you think it wrong about it? The terminology they used? "turn written out in full" makes perfect sense. It's a turn, just written out... in full...

    Like, rather than putting the usual ~ marking, he probably wanted a very specific ornamentation and wrote it out so there would be no debate over how to play it properly.

    In fact, "turn written out in full" is probably more accurate than "septuplet", since really it's just an ornament and not part of the music.
     
  4. NYCO10

    NYCO10 Pianissimo User

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    Thanks, but as you probably know a turn starts on the note above the written note, then goes to the written note, followed by the note below the written note. then ends back on the written note. this is only 4 notes. and using this as an example, A turn is written above the note A hence the notes B, A,G and the A should be played but the notes in the Raindrop are Eb, up to F, down to Eb, down to D natural, back to Eb up to F, then up to G, this is the sextuplet. still confused!
     
  5. Pete Anderson

    Pete Anderson Pianissimo User

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    Well, that's why he "wrote it out in full" ;) It's still basically a turn, it's just not a completely standard one (although it really isn't that different). That's why he specified what notes and how to play it.

    Using the term "septuplet" implies that it's part of the melody or hamony, or at the very least that it takes up a beat. It does none of those things, it's an ornament.

    When talking about grace notes, do you call them eighth notes?
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2010
  6. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    I did the majority of my trumpet education in jazz, but I am pretty sure that the turn is played different ways depending on when the piece was written, and possibly where as well.
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Last edited: May 8, 2010
  8. flugelgirl

    flugelgirl Forte User

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    Okay, bottom row - I recognize whistle, sleigh bells, gun, slide whistle, bike horn and wind chimes, but what are the rest?? One of them looks like a toilet!:dontknow:
     
  9. Pete Anderson

    Pete Anderson Pianissimo User

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    Wow! Cool website. I never knew there was a symbol to indicate triple tonguing. It looks like an alien smiley face: [​IMG]


    I think the toilet one (it's just the top of the toilet right? With the flushing handle on the right) might be one of those noisemakers you crank to use.
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2010
  10. flugelgirl

    flugelgirl Forte User

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    I think the toilet one (it's just the top of the toilet right? With the flushing handle on the right) might be one of those noisemakers you crank to use.[/QUOTE]

    Oohhhh - yeah! I think you're right! A rachet, right? :-)
     

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