using breath attacks in warm up long tones

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by wrigrn, Jun 15, 2011.

  1. wrigrn

    wrigrn New Friend

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    Hi Folks !! After reading several posts on embouchure rebuilding and warm ups for comebackers , I got out my old copy of Daily Embouchure Studies that I played all the way through college. However, I'm only doing the long tone exercises out of the booklet, then go to the Clarke First study. I am experimenting with using breath attacks on the long tones and would like to know your opinions concerning this method. Thanks, Wrigrn (Ron)
     
  2. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    My thought is that if it helps you, continue doing it. Otherwise, stop.

    I think that sometimes we overthink what it is we are supposed to be doing. There is certainly a use for breath attacks in building technique, so if that helps you to be more musical when you are playing music, isn't that the factor that should be considered most?
     
  3. wrigrn

    wrigrn New Friend

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    Thanks trickg, for the reply. I think it was rowuk who mentioned that he had his students do long tones with breath attacks, plus I had also read about too open of a lip aperture causing a little too much lip pressure. I only started doing this the last few days, and don't know yet as to its benefits. I do know the long tones along with the clarke chromatics are helping me feel a little more secure with range and sound.
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I never use the "breath attack" because exhaling into the horn is not attacking anything.

    My concept is called the circle of breath. Visualize a circle when breathing. Going up the left side is inhale, down the right is exhale. Notice at the top and bottom of the circle that there is a smooth but infinitely small transition between in- and exhale. I teach breathing first until the inhale is big, transition smooth and exhale steady. Then we replace exhale with play. No additional diaphragm or abs - just exhale. Once that works, we are well on our way to getting it right for a daily routine. inhale exhale.

    Much of the playing that I do needs little more than that
     
  5. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    my two cents ... I think comebackers are prone to not using enough air or breath support in there playing. Probably because it was natural at one time and we never thought much about it. So it sounds like a great way to approach commencing a note... for you ... at this time .... if it works.... and will help you be more musical... but don't create alot of tension in this process ( that's my way of +1 everyone who has posted so far)
    I actually think the lack of breath support and air stream angle are also reasons for off days on the trumpet...
     
  6. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    FWIW, I think that working on real attacks are probably a more productive use of time in the practice room. How often does the average player really work on that aspect of their playing to find that balance where the tongue and the air meet a precisely the same time to give a clean, clear, focused articulation at the start of a note? For those who might be reading this who have never broken that down, try it sometime - you might find that the "chiff" of the tongue attack starts before the air, so effectively you'll get "T--aaaa..." rather than "tAAAAAA" like it should be. Not sure if I made sense with that. (All things considered, it's "easier" to attack a note hard than soft, and a player who can cleanly articulate softly can invariably articulate harder if necessary, but the reverse is not true.)
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Once you have a decent process for producing tone worked out, I agree. Before that, I find exhaling useful because the player can't cheat by tonguing harder. I use my circle of breath even tody to keep my breathing and tone production "grounded".
     
  8. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    It can be beneficial spending some time using a "puh" rather than a "tuh" attack when playing long tones; playing as softly as possible and getting louder until just before the point where the sound gets ugly, followed by a diminuendo to nothing. This will really focus and strengthen the chops, and we can't make it work by using brute force!

    Have fun!
     
  9. Satchmo Brecker

    Satchmo Brecker Piano User

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    I think what you're calling a breath attack would be represented by the sound "ha", versus a regular attack "ta". One of the first things I read on TM was about the Caruso Method. Just google it and you'll find info on it. The basic idea was to start on middle G and play a simple rhythm using ha-ta-ta. The idea being breath control and overall horn control. I found the exercises very helpful, at the very least because I did in fact get a sense of control over the horn.
     
  10. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The consummate trumpeter needs it all. The trick is to find the right order and enough time to speed development.
     

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