Using Old Tired Horns

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by waylon101, Feb 16, 2014.

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  1. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    With utter cream?
     
  2. Conntribution

    Conntribution Fortissimo User

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    Bag Balm.
     
  3. larry tscharner

    larry tscharner Forte User

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    We know about cows here where I live. Dont knock utter cream, like vasoline and wd-40 and duct tape, it has a million and one uses. Nice slide lube, though I have switched to the real thing and save the utter cream for my dry cracked hands. Best wishes.
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Who's knocking it. It appears to be keeping his hooters pristine. That to me is a good thing.
     
  5. B-Flat Cat

    B-Flat Cat Pianissimo User

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    I believe y'all are utterly confused about udders.:-?
     
  6. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Some of them have had all the good notes played out of them and are worn out...:lol: Some of the old ones that are in good mechanical condition can be gems, though.
     
  7. Bay Area Brass

    Bay Area Brass Piano User

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    When I acquire a vintage horn these days, I get a Reeves Valve Adjustment and have it ultra-sonically cleaned-that way the horn will play as it was supposed to.

    I've had a horn re-lacqurered in the past and felt it came back a different horn. Modern lacquer I'm not thrilled with, and buffing a vintage horn is something I stay away from. My horns now were stripped to the raw brass w/o buffing and were sprayed with a thin coat of nitrocellulose lacquer. That being said, every player has their preference and the only right answer is what works for you.
     
  8. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    I had my main horn restored - relacquered, new lead pipe, valves rebuilt. It was my 1974 lightweight Bach 43. It came back a better version of what it was.

    I realize everyone is different. And maybe different people have different sensitivities when changes are made to their horn. But for me, it was worth every penny.

    Mike
     
  9. Bay Area Brass

    Bay Area Brass Piano User

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    For me it's an issue for older vintage horns-early 60's and older, since lacquer is different now than before. I also feel that players who gravitate to vintage horns do so because of the unique character of their horns-not only the brand/model but each horn itself. I've had a horn come back restored and re-lacquered with modern lacquer-it came back playing very nice and even, but not the same sound and response.

    I think Mike is spot on that it's about the individual player and the type of playing they do.
     

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