Using Too Much Air

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Domination3785, Jun 16, 2015.

  1. PelicansRule

    PelicansRule Pianissimo User

    185
    35
    Feb 2, 2015
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Yup. That's what I'd say too. If the diaphragm is doing the work the air comes with much less force at the mouthpiece. It feels almost like the air in your throat makes the sound, not the air from your lungs.
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,957
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    The diaphragm can only be used for the inhale. If we push, it is with the abs. The problem is that the horn and mouthpiece regulate the max amount of air that can flow. If we do not have a mature embouchure and breathing habits, the harder we blow, the more the backpressure.


     
  3. PelicansRule

    PelicansRule Pianissimo User

    185
    35
    Feb 2, 2015
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Check this out for too much air....

    Sean Jones on Trumpet tonight, live in Pittsburgh!

    video to follow...

    ...well, maybe not. Files are too large I guess. He was wailing though! You should see it!
     
  4. Tomaso

    Tomaso Pianissimo User

    230
    102
    Oct 2, 2014
    New York City
    Wow! Talk about too much air!!
    Get a life!
     
  5. PelicansRule

    PelicansRule Pianissimo User

    185
    35
    Feb 2, 2015
    Pittsburgh, PA
    I disagree. I think it is the opposite, respectfully.
     
  6. PelicansRule

    PelicansRule Pianissimo User

    185
    35
    Feb 2, 2015
    Pittsburgh, PA
    ?
     
  7. stumac

    stumac Fortissimo User

    2,776
    1,904
    Oct 19, 2008
    Flinders Vic Australia
    Respectfully you are wrong and rowuk is right, ask anyone that has studied anatomy and physiology, the medical men on here will agree.

    Regards, Stuart.
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,127
    9,302
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
  9. treble_forte

    treble_forte Pianissimo User

    172
    104
    Sep 11, 2007
    N. Ireland
    Respectfully, you are completely wrong - at least on the level of physiology and nomenclature.

    The diaphragm is an involuntary muscle, the primary function of which is inspiration. When it is contracting it lowers the abdominal pressure bringing air into the lungs. You have no control over the contraction of this muscle, hence involuntary.

    Diaphragm Function, Definition & Definition | Body Maps

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muscles_of_respiration



    It is a common misconception perpetuated by many many teachers. Insofar as being a term used to help a student visualise pushing air out it isn't particularly evil, though entirely incorrect, but why can we not just attribute the actual muscles used instead? Or use language like 'situp muscles' etc... I notice a correlation between those who teach 'diaphragm muscle' playing with those who insist the belly is distended, which is also entirely counter productive.

    Mike
     
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,127
    9,302
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    Actually it is not the diaphragm that is voluntary or involuntary, but rater the nervous system that is voluntary or involuntary. The diaphragm is innocent, and just does what it is told. There are three types of muscle in the body: skeletal, smooth and cardiac. Skeletal muscle contracts in response to a nerve impulse at the individual muscle cell's neural plate. The diaphragm has ONLY skeletal muscle, so it must have an impulse delivered to contract. That impulse can originate in the higher brain centers as when we voluntarily inhale and exhale or in the lower brain as when low oxygen levels or high levels of acid or carbon dioxide are present in the cerebrospinal fluid or blood. Of course this would mean in Kingtrumpet's case it is all involuntary. But whereas, we higher intellectual life forms can voluntary take over control. Thank God for the great creator's knowledge of electrical wiring! And remember and never forget... Jaco died for our sins.
     

Share This Page