Valve Alignment

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by JNINWI, Apr 27, 2011.

  1. JNINWI

    JNINWI Piano User

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    Apr 26, 2011
    Earth
    A few weeks ago I had my valves aligned. Has anyone else had this done and if so I'm curious as to what you think about how your horn performs now vs. prior to the alignment.
     
  2. trumpetman41

    trumpetman41 Pianissimo User

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    Feb 17, 2009
    Omaha, NE
    I had my horn checked. 25 years old and no misalignment. None of my horns were out enough to make a difference, but some folks think you need to have it done. If I were to drop my horn, maybe. All of the tonal qualities were still there....
    It's not like I am driving a car..... Another way to make a buck.
     
  3. bagmangood

    bagmangood Forte User

    It will usually improve a horn (if it was done by a good tech).
    Whether it will be significant (or "worth it") depends on you and your horn. Some horns are horribly out of alignment and can cause problems from the efficiency stand point, but if you are used to the way it plays, then it could "ruin" your horn.
    OR you might not notice any difference. Some people aren't horn sensitive and/or the horn wasn't that off to begin with.
    YMMV
     
  4. Dave Mickley

    Dave Mickley Forte User

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    I have had a PVA done on quite a few of my horns over the years and in some cases I didn't notice a thing, in most cases the intonation improved and in a couple of cases it was like I got a different horn - more open and freer with better intonation. Each horn is different and be sure to use a tech that has done this before and knows what they are doing. I have a friend who took his new horn to a local music store and they ended up destroying a valve and then had the gall to charge him for the work and a new valve.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The proper gap adds an inefficiency to the resonating system. That means its effect can never be additive. I thing getting the gap right is mostly there to get the proper length of the mouthpiece/leadpipe which in turn helps find the sweet spot for the tuning slide position. More important is making sure the receiver and mouthpiece have a real snug fit to couple the mass.
     
  6. JNINWI

    JNINWI Piano User

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    Apr 26, 2011
    Earth
    I agree Rowuk, I had the mouthpiece gapped when I got the horn, like I do with all my horns. I had the valves aligned by Bob Reeves and the difference is like night and day. Very free blowing and the horn does anything you need it to do. Along with all the notes being very centered, my range has improved, the notes lock right in. Pitch and consistancy are improved. Overall, relaxing on the horn became MUCH easier. I'm VERY impressed with the changes that have happened as a result of the alignment. Mr Reeves is one of the best out there !!! I HIGHLY suggest this for any Pro player if you haven't already had it done.
     
  7. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Oregon
    I have a Conn 8B Artist that is unplayable because the intonation is so bad ..... Not just my opinion, but of my teacher too. He even named the bad notes but all I heard was "trip to the tech." If an alignment doesn't fix that, I don't know what will.:-(

    Turtle
     
  8. bagmangood

    bagmangood Forte User

    New horn? :roll:
     
  9. oldlou

    oldlou Forte User

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    The last Conn 8B trumpets were made in the late 1970's. This means that unless his horn was a NOS in storage for over 30 years it cannot be a new horn.


    OLDLOU>>
     
  10. Myszolow

    Myszolow Pianissimo User

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    Apr 23, 2011
    I think the "new horn?" comment was a suggestion as to what might fix the problem in answering...

    At least, that's how I read it.
     

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