Valve Guides - Brass or Nylon?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Trumpet Dreamer, Dec 13, 2010.

  1. Trumpet Dreamer

    Trumpet Dreamer Mezzo Forte User

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    Which type of guide is better...brass or nylon?
    Just purchased a Xeno "heavy" upgrade kit for my 2335 and it has the brass guides.
     
  2. rivnut

    rivnut Pianissimo User

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    Oct 27, 2010
    I don't see how you could go wrong with either the nylon or the brass, both can wear, but it will take a very long time. I've seen wear on 80 year old guides. These new ones should see you through.
     
  3. Octiceps

    Octiceps Pianissimo User

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    This topic has been discussed at length here and at the Trumpet Herald, but one isn't necessarily better than the other better. I bought the same kit for my 2335 a while back and found that the metal guides darkened the sound on my otherwise bright horn.

    HOWEVER, I quickly switched back to the nylon ones because the clanking noise caused by the metal guides was almost unbearable to me. Also, the metal guides caused the sideways alignment of my valves to be off by quite a bit. You see, the diameter of the circular inner part of the metal guide is a few millimeters smaller than that of the nylon one, causing the metal guide to rattle around inside the guide slot of the piston. Now that I think back on it, I probably shouldn't have bought the metal valve guides because I'm not so sure they work for Yamaha horns that don't originally come with them, such as the 2335. They should fit fine on the older 6335HS Mark II, Bobby Shew, and Xeno horns.
     
  4. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Nylon is quieter.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    No difference. Except in the expectations of certain types of players. I prefer the quiet of plastic.
     
  6. walldaja

    walldaja Pianissimo User

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    Feb 25, 2008
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    Agree nylon is quieter; however, considering the slight side loads on the guides it would take a LONG time to see noticeable wear in either type. It seems interesting that once they were always metal then many transitioned to nylon as it became available and now some manufacturers are returning to metal. I would like to know their rationale.
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I did forget one thing. A student horn like the Yamaha 2xxx is pretty insensitive to mild modding, That is what makes it such a great beginners horn. A Xeno kit is only useful for optics - kind of a pimp my trumpet thing. Useless in performance, subject of meaningless geek conversations.

    If you want a real change in the 2xxx you need to move bell braces.
     
  8. Trumpet Dreamer

    Trumpet Dreamer Mezzo Forte User

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    This sheds a whole new light on the subject. As my Yammie has now been "pimped", am I about to move into the professional ranks?

    In all seriousness, my only goal was to provide a slightly more solid (heavier) feel to the pistons. It was hoped the springs in the Xeno kit would be of a heavier build. Nothing more, nothing less.

    There was (and is) no desire to alter the tone character of the horn.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2010
  9. dsr0057

    dsr0057 Pianissimo User

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    Dec 20, 2009
    Denton, TX
    I agree with Rowuk there is no difference except what the players mind conceives.

    If you want a heavier sound move bell braces or get a custom lead pipe/tuning slide. I have known people to put dimes in the bottom of their piston casing for a slightly darker sound as well.
     

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