Valve Slide Tuning

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Sethoflagos, Aug 31, 2015.

  1. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    In the old days, valve slide tuning for me was a matter of pulling third slide out for low D, C#, and just lipping everything else. An element of Hobson's choice in this as I never had a first valve shunt until quite recently.

    For one reason or other, that doesn't work for me on the Yamaha so I've had to learn a whole lot of new stuff. I don't mind saying that it's given me some real grief since for me at least it seems to be a really unforgiving instrument for off-centre notes. But get it right and the sound is...well let's not get hyperbolic...more than okay :-)

    I can't for the life of me move two slides accurately at the same time, so I've ended up with this strategy:

    Combination 1-2: kick out 1st slide a quarter inch(ish).
    Combination 1-3: kick out 1st slide a half inch(ish).
    Combination 2-3: sometimes a smidgeon on 3rd for G#, D#.
    Combination 1-2-3: give 3rd as much as it needs subject to where 1st is currently sat.

    I've tried doing the last of these on 1st as well but the slide threatens to come off on low Db (the worst note of the lot).

    This seems to work pretty well on A major which historically was one of my most awkward keys for tuning. Maybe some little tweaks and adjustments to be found in other keys.

    How does this compare with others (especially the Xeno players)?
     
  2. Dennis78

    Dennis78 Fortissimo User

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    I find a first slide trigger easy to use in unison with the third for c# and low f#, but mainly the first slide adjment is useless for me
     
  3. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    On my personal Bb (Jaeger 37) I chose to not have a 1st slide adjustment. I have removed first thumb hooks from various brands for several pros.
     
  4. Dennis78

    Dennis78 Fortissimo User

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    How is it really useful? Seems like it's just bling. I can use the third slide for everything, and my collegiate trumpet has no on the fly adjustment and I think it does fine. But I'm no pro or orchestra player, just a guy in a community band livin it up
     
  5. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    I don't need one either on instruments with wide slots (though I'd rather have the facility than not). Rowuk has further said in other threads that some manufacturer's (Yamaha, Monette, maybe others) have started designing 1st valve to be precisely tuned, rather than a slightly longer compromise. Hence, my comment in the OP that this thread was more directed to, say, Xeno players rather than, say, Holton Collegiate players.
     
  6. Clarkvinmazz

    Clarkvinmazz Forte User

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    I have noticed that one older trumpets without the ring, u don't really need it. However, on my strads I definitely do- any combination of 1 and 2 will be at least a couple cents sharp, particularly the a above the staff. I also find that although it's easy just to use the third valve slide for C# and lip it the test of the way down, the note is actually in tune only when both slides are used. I think it also depends on how you hold the horn, I have large hands and use the 'spock' grip. (Two fingers above, two below, middle finder in ring) this allows me the ability to use both slides very easily together when I need to.
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I use the first valve slide for A and E, and the third slide for the rest unless there is something with a pattern that makes this strategy unpractical.
     

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