Valve Trombone

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by surfingmusicman, Dec 28, 2011.

  1. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    Congrats KT,
    I still would have gone with a valve trom first, then a slide later. Good luck, to me the slide it is a longer path to playing in the Trom register.

    Let me know about the Trom Asymmetric KT special mpce.... just one more would be better...aha!
     
  2. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    Congratulations! Give us an update in a couple months on how you're doing with it.

    Mike
     
  3. edfitzvb

    edfitzvb Forte User

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    I have an Olds Valve/Slide trombone that I mess with from time to time. I haven't learned the slide positions yet (as I said, I only pull it out from time to time) but I will absolutely and unequivocably state that the horn plays much easier with the slide. It is much more responsive without the valves.
     
  4. Local 357

    Local 357 Banned

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    With the slide I'd suggest just playing blues in F improvisation. All you use is the first and third positions to play the blues scale. Similar to the trumpet blues in G where we only use the open and first valve positions. Do this for a while to gain confidence. Try playing along with Nat Adderly's "Work Song" here:

    Cannonball Adderley Sextet- Work Song - YouTube

    Third position is with the slide handle just a bit short of the bell section. You can play most all the melody and the changes simply by vacillating between first and third position!

    The slide is most valuable in the upper register. It picks off the upper tones easier with less clams. And you can use those "short" positions. Never any need to go past the third position once above a concert middle C
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2012
  5. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    Yeah - a Marching bone and/or valve trombone was going for $400+, while I got this Olds bone for $60 -----so for now --- I am just checking out things. Hopefully I will learn the Bass clef and the slide positions --- I mean, c'mon there are only 7 positions, how hard can it be???? There are about the same amount of valve combos for the trumpet also --- and we all know that was a piece of cake to learn!!!!!!!!!! ROFL ROFL ROFL
     
  6. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    The bass clef notes are the same as those in the treble clef, just an octave + lower and in a different place. Again, the placement of the notes in the bass clef ascending and alternating line and space are GABCDEFGA. Add a BCD and the next note is an E on the bottom line of the treble clef. Some simply eyeball a note in the bass clef as being a line or space lower than it appears in the treble clef. Saves monkeying with the brain cells IMO.

    Two slide T-bones may create a problem not easily overcome. Between the two the slide positions may vary a little. The only solution is to become as familiar with both as easily as you are between your left and right arm.

    I had Doug M round off the outer rim of my Asymmetric 342 as much as he could as made it a bit more comfortable. I really don't use it much but found it does get me into the altissimo range. Now I find my Schilke P5-4 picc does it easier in the rare times I play up there.

    Still if ever John makes an Asymmetric for the T-bone, I too would be interested.
     
  7. Cornetist

    Cornetist New Friend

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    I you have the patience, learn to play the regular slide trombone. It has a nicer tone, generally. Also, you will then be able to play a slide trumpet!!! (Same range as a trumpet, but plays like a trombone) They are kind of a novelty, but cause a lot of interest when you play one in a jazz gig.
     
  8. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    They are fun for a jazz gig, although when I lent my slide trumpet to an experienced slide trom player he laughed his head off, as he slid the slide straight off on the first couple of notes.... The Slide trumpet is a real animal in itself to learn, the positions and intonation are extreme.
     
  9. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    Interesting thought. Last night was my first night joining a community band. One of the SLIDE trombonists told me I should have gotten a Baritone --- so I wouldn't have to learn the slide. I explained that I might as well learn the slide first --- and also learn to play the thing in base cleff. I think the trombonists was "uncertain" of the possibility of doubling on 2 brass instruments.
    Anyways I got the Slide bone in the mail today -- took it out, and with the slide in (whatever note that is) --- and played a nice sounding note, then the slide out to (I think) the third position -- another fine sounding note. Yup, about 5 minutes of "ooom pah, omm pah" ---and that is it 2 notes -- both sound good.
     
  10. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    Use a tuner..... get the 7 positions pretty clear.
    Get a Beginners Book for Slide Trom. It will be easy to learn. The Valve is really fast - maybe a week-end of time, and you will be OK, then just rotate the practice sessions. With a slide yoou will take longer, as I have said you will take longer to learn it to play in tune compared to the Valve trom. The only way to learn the Slide is to play with a tuner, and get each note in tune. The positions will change slightly as the instrument warms up etc, so the tuning slide is used.

    Good luck
     

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