Valves

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by BachM, Nov 20, 2015.

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  1. BachM

    BachM Pianissimo User

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    Is it possible to rework valves into a grove? I know this happens when a new instrument is broken in, but is it possible for an already broken in instrument?
     
  2. BachM

    BachM Pianissimo User

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    Additional detail:

    My valves began sticking after extensive cleaning, I took it to my tech who cleaned and polished the valves and valve casings. He said that during cleaning, build-up broke off and scratched the valves and valve casings, as the trumpet is somewhat older. He said that the sticking also may be due to being broken in wrong and does not stick when the valves are depressed at an angle, which I found to be quite true.

    Anyways, I would like to know if it is possible to depress the valves correctly and break them into a new groove that resists sticking. I believe this possible due to monel being extremely flexible and easy to work with.

    Currently, I oil it every day and change the oil every now and then. I also play it straight down rather than at an angle, which seems to be working so far. It barely sticks after being warmed up.

    The main questions is, what exactly else could I do to help, besides replating?

    I detest replating the valves due to the ultimate destruction of the originality of the instrument.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I hope your tech did not "polish" the valves. We normally lap the valves in with a special compound that leaves fine scratches that are there on purpose.

    How much can be lapped depends on the current amount of valve wear. If the valves are very worn, pushing at a different angle only removes more material.

    If your goal is playing the horn, a replate/relap could be a an easy way to get top performance again. If you are collecting, then maybe originality would have a higher value. I only buy to play and therefore the mechanical integrity is top priority. In my view, protective maintenance by a really qualified tech maintains the value.
     
  4. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    Without seeing the instrument!!

    It sounds as though you have 2 alternates:
    Have the valves fitted properly (which may or may not involve honing casings and plating pistons)
    or
    Keep the trumpet as an ornament.

    The damage has already been done, the ship has already sailed - we techs can only work with what is presented, we cannot wind back the clock.
     
  5. BachM

    BachM Pianissimo User

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    Not sure of his exact words, but he knows what he was doing, he likely did what you described.
     
  6. BachM

    BachM Pianissimo User

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    It is not a major problem, and has seemed to decrease in frequency after much playing.
     
  7. BachM

    BachM Pianissimo User

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    What does replating constitute?
     
  8. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    About $450 from a competent tech/Anderson's.
     
  9. BachM

    BachM Pianissimo User

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    What exactly do they do?
     
  10. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    What Ivan said in red. Only an inspection by a competent tech will tell you for sure. What make and model of trumpet are we talking about anyway?
     

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