Van Cliburn Competition on PBS

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Markie, Sep 2, 2010.

  1. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    If you are unfamiliar with this competition, you are in for a treat. This week, PBS is airing The Van Cliburn Competition in Fort Worth Texas. It is a piano competition that happens every four years and the wealth of knowledge these people pass on when they are interviewed applies to all forms of making music. Oh, and one last thing, this isn't a basic music competition. There's a fair chance that the semi finalists are better than anyone we know.
     
  2. johnande

    johnande Pianissimo User

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    Markie... thanks for the post. I spent 2 hours watching the competition last night; without doubt some of the most brilliant musicians I have seen or heard. Tied for first place was blind Japanese player whose name I can't remember. Many thoughts come to mind: 1) how early in life genius manifests itself; 2) even with the usual compensatory senses (hearing etc) that occur with blindness, what great talent a blind pianist must have to compete at such a high level; 3) how can judges distinguish between 12 players, each with such great talent; 4) where was I when the musical genes were being passed out??? Such talent is almost unbelieveable.... Thanks again. JA
     
  3. Back at it

    Back at it Pianissimo User

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    I watched this last night. Wonderful display of talent. I wish I had the prodigy gene, lol. Excellent television.
     
  4. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    The Van Clilburn Foundation of Fort Worth TX as host the Van Cliburn competition will get new CEO, the one who formerly was CEO of the North Carolina Symphony.
     
  5. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    hi johnande
    The two winners are Hoachen Zhang and Nobuyuki Tsujii.
    Nobu is the one that's blind from birth. Here's what a couple of the judges thought of Nobu:
    Van Cliburn is quoted as saying, "Miracle is the only word to describe him. This is truly the act of God.".

    Juror Richard Dyer said, "Very seldom do I close my notebook and just give myself over to it, and he made that necessary. I didn't want to be interrupted in what I was hearing."
    --
    It was great that the camera was able to pan around and show the people wiping tears from their eyes when this young man played Chopin.
    This guy is touched by the finger of God. I've never heard or seen anything more musically touching.
     
  6. Jerry Freedman

    Jerry Freedman Piano User

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    I love this stuff but I don't listen enough to get the details. I didn't get the touched by god part or why he was different from the other players. Maybe someone can enlighten me?
     
  7. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    I can't put this any other way. Only you can enlighten you.
    Listen without prejudice.
     
  8. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    The "touched by God" comment was in reference to the blind pianist. Certainly NO printed media or other illustration can apply to the method of learning for such disadvantaged.
     
  9. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Thanks Ed, You're far more eloquent than me.
     
  10. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Classical piano / harpichord / clavichord / and harps are musical tranquility for me. Many hours of bed ridden time have I listened. Certainly, I grew up with my Mom playing the piano with professional skill. I can't remember what it was, but one Saturday evening she sat down and played a complete symphony ... making the statement afterward that she would never be fool enough to do that again. I've later thought that she wouldn't play that symphony again, because many nights after the supper dishes were put away, she would sit down and play until she prepared for bed.

    All I can say is that her playing was about all that was possible to listen to while I did my academic lessons.
     

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