Vaseline on lips

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by crowmadic, Mar 18, 2007.

  1. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 3, 2006
    I just read a thread by TMer AMAZINGMORRIS with a mouthpiece question. But what caught my attention was his mention of using vaseline on his lips because he has a "wet emouchure, and wants to reduce the accumulation of spit in the trumpet". His concern was about the effect of the vaseline on the mouthpiece finish, but my concern is about using vaseline. I've been fooling with a Kelly mouthpiece and find myself going dry quicker than usual; metal also. I'm interrupting some passages and phrases that I normally wouldn't, just to lick my lips. What's the "skinny" on this development?
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Vaseline "lubricates" the lips in an unnatural way. There is no longer any "grip" from the mouthpiece. Even when you play with "wet lips" like I do, there is no "film" of water between mouthpiece and lips. They are "moist" and this allows for a certain amount of movement without destroying the grip. That doesn't mean that one can't play when vaseline is used, it just means that the mouthpiece has been "robbed" of one of its basic functions - and that work must be assumed by the face muscle structure.
     
  3. Alex Yates

    Alex Yates Forte User

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    Rowuk gave you some good advice. I might also add that playing a plastic mouthpiece will require more moisture because it is more porous. When I play my ivory mouthpiece, I have to moisten it more often than my metal mouthpieces. Silver is more porous than gold and has a little extra grip as well.

    A side note: of the moisture that gets in the horn, 99% of it is condensation, not saliva. It is the same as fogging up a window. When you blow warm air through cold metal, condensation forms.....hence the gurgling water we get. Even in the mouthpiece this happens. Keep that in mind.

    I would skip the Vaseline for that purpose and simply moisten the mouthpiece more often.
     
  4. stchasking

    stchasking Forte User

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    I'm with Alex. I would suggest you use a gold plated mouthpiece if you want dry lubrication. This was suggested to me but I didn't shed the money to have it done.

    I think Chop Saver is also pretty good for this. They are a sponser of this site.

    I also like Alex' point that it is condensation inside the horn, not saliva. I provided this information 10 years ago to some people in the community band I played in. They have used it as a running joke ever since. Mosly the wood wind players. It is easy enough to prove by using a clear plastic hose as a natural trumpet. You can see the condensation form.
     
  5. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 3, 2006
    Great input as usual...thanks guys and Alex. I don't think I'll make the Kelly my main mouthpiece. I bought a clear "Screamer" model after trying their 3C. I like the cup feel, and I do hit high notes easily with it. It's been a good learning tool, and it's a great novelty/conversation piece.
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    A jeweler can just plate the rim if you want to save money. As the plate is only microns thick, I do not expect any change in playing characteristics due to mass or the slightly smaller size!
     

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