Very high volume playing

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by jaemard, Jan 21, 2013.

  1. jaemard

    jaemard Mezzo Piano User

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    How is that a shame? If I'm playing fine, but not loud enough, it's easier to fix than playing horribly while blasting.
     
  2. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    I just meant that I don't think louder = better, not that YOU were playing badly... Maybe he just thought you were slacking for a minute or something. Maybe he says that to everyone no matter how they are playing like a sadistic drill sargeant. I get the DCI thing, but overblowing can be bad for your sound, bad for your chops, but it is what it is.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    When testosterone replaces brain, everything becomes a crap shoot. You need to start playing more intelligently. In a concert band, the piccolo is ALWAYS heard even although it is not even half as loud as a trumpet. It simply has a tone that cuts through. You need to develop a sound that cuts through - not by brute force, rather by INTELLIGENCE.

    I am very critical of the drum and bugle/DCI setting. Out of the lineup, there are too many literally blowing their brains out. At full power, there is not much energy left for musical expression...........
     
  4. Ljazztrm

    Ljazztrm Piano User

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    There are just some gigs where you have to play extremely loud. Sometimes I sub with a pro drum + bugle core and do various latin jazz gigs outside as well where we are playing at top volume. Not to mention outdoor big band type concerts. It sounds like you are bottoming out. But you don't want to switch to a deeper mouthpiece because that will effect the type of brilliant volume you're trying to get. I'm willing to bet that you are playing on a rim diameter that is too big for you. Usually, players who bottom out on shallow mouthpieces don't experience this if they switch to a narrower diameter. Of course there are exceptions depending on your embouchure and lip size/thickness. Too add to this I would recommend a variation on an exercise posted here awhile back by user 'Markie'... He called it 7 and 7 and I think it's from Claude Gordon. You start with open position 0 and slur harmonically from low C to G above high c (Markie recommends you go as high as you can, but I think that will teach distortion of the chops as they may manipulate too much to play to the top of your range...for this exercise we want to build strength, yes, but also coordination and balance..this is vital.) So, you start out with open position and do the low C to G above high C. You do this for 1 minute and then go to the 123 position and do that for 1 minute. The pattern is 0, 123, 12, 23, 12, 1, 2. So you are doing 7 valve combinations in seven minutes, hence the name 7 and 7. Don't blast these...softer and a warm sound and not too fast either as you can cheat that way...what you want to do is get a moderate and EVEN tempo...use a metronome (like in the quarter note = 110-120 range and the notes are 8th notes), or think of one going in your head to keep the harmonics even. Hope this helps. Best, Lex
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2013
  5. Ljazztrm

    Ljazztrm Piano User

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    BTW, the Warburton EESV cup is really good. Also...Mark Curry has made me a very shallow top as well in a .590 diameter..It's the 590S2 Lex Samu model....super piece!!
     
  6. jaemard

    jaemard Mezzo Piano User

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    Thanks for the pointers, Lex, but I don't think I'm bottoming out. I'm not using a shallow cup, as I don't need to play any higher than an E in the staff. 3rd trumpet part, I'm not very good. It's simply a volume thing, I need to put all the air I can through the mouthpiece. While maintaining good tone, of course.
     
  7. Ljazztrm

    Ljazztrm Piano User

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    Ah, I see...still for the loud outdoor style playing a shallow cup will give you more brilliant volume..of course the horn is a factor too...do you have a nice ML lightweight horn? Many, many players use a lighter horn and specs around. 460 bore with a 5" bell. If you were playing a more classical style, id recommend a deeper mouthpiece, like a bach c or b cup with a bigger throat and backbore. A bach C or B cup with a 24 throat/24 backbore is very popular with orchestral players. They aren't playing screaming high, but extremely powerfully. Both a good lead style player and a good orchestral player should be able to produce tremendous amounts of sound..it just takes different equipment to do it..one doesn't work for other!:-)
     
  8. Phil986

    Phil986 Forte User

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    I would tend to agree with that. Like extreme high notes, Fortissimo playing is kind of a special effect. Anything that relies on it extensively enough to make a main feature is bound to be like a dish with too much spice, the taste is lost. There are fortissmo passages in music, especially for brass, but what proportion of the total time does it represent? What composer would write an entire piece oscillating between f and fff?

    I prefer the full range of flavors. I wouldn't say that DCI is "bad" or anything like that but I know for sure it wouldn't have been for me.
     
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Nah... That's why God created Electrical Engineers... To create outdoor sound systems. Trumpet playing should be relaxed, and in God's hands... THAT is in His Great Plan... which validates the existence of electrical engineers. The word according to God.
     
  10. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Since you say you're not bottoming out, maybe you are playing as loud as possible. If you're playing 3rd part, there is great difficulty in even sounding as loud as the players on the upper parts - the higher frequencies carry much better. Other than trying a slightly larger mouthpiece with a more open throat (or a "louder" trumpet, but that's not cheap), I don't have any advice.
     

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