Very important question

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Easytrumpet, Aug 9, 2015.

  1. Ed Kennedy

    Ed Kennedy Forte User

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    One of my teachers, the late great Leon Merian, had a rule of thumb for mouthpiece placement: Place your mouthpiece on the upper lip right up by your nose, tip it up so the shank is pointing up about 45 degrees, now the outside edge of the rim is contacting your lip. Slide it down in that position until the outside edge slips off the gums to the teeth. There is your spot. From there it's firm corners, flat chops and chin with a sneer as you go higher and, as he would say: "AIR ON!"
     
  2. Easytrumpet

    Easytrumpet New Friend

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    What do you mean by that and i'm not sure i want to switch now because school starts next week for me and i don't want to be the sucky person that can't play high enough for there Eb scale...
     
  3. Easytrumpet

    Easytrumpet New Friend

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    I don't quite understand what you told me what to do...
     
  4. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    My suggestion would be for you to play long tones. Lots and lots of soft, easy long tones - nothing above a tuning C, and really, from 2nd line G down to low F# would probably be better. You can't force your chops to find a good set, and it's developed over time with patience. The long tones will help your chops find their set and focus.

    Something else that I believe also helps is lots of single tonguing exercises, which can also help focus your embouchure, but the long tones are going to help more.

    And rest - make sure to rest between exercises.

    As I sit here typing this, it reminds me of the night I took my screening audition for the Army band program. The US Army Jazz Ambassadors were in North Platte, Nebraska, and my recruiter hooked me up with an audition with Chief Warrant Officer Charles Booker, who was the leader of the JA's at the time. He passed me, but with the warning that I had barely passed, and I needed to shape some stuff up before I got to the Armed Forces School of Music. He reinforced the point by saying that the Army needed cooks and truck drivers just as badly as they needed trumpet players, and that if I couldn't hack it at the school of music, the Army would be more than happy to make me into one of those instead.

    In any case, part of the advice he gave me to help me get some additional consistency and strength with my chops was the bit about long tones, and making sure to rest enough during my practice. CW Booker was also a fine trumpet player, and knew what he was talking about. :-)
     
  5. Easytrumpet

    Easytrumpet New Friend

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    This forum still hasn't answered my original question but instead altered it into a different topic answering questions made by you...not me. I would love to get the answer i was waiting for from VB
     
  6. Easytrumpet

    Easytrumpet New Friend

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    And if i do switch to flat lips and playing in the middle of the mouthpiece, how long will i suck til i get back to my normal playing and better and how can i keep my lip flatness consistent?
     
  7. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    Well I think you have been given good advice, and your questions answered - BUT for most, you just say I don't understand. Maybe time to get a real teacher who plays trumpet to help you. Forums don't help if you do not have the experience to understand basic concepts.

    But Lest us see your questions in the original :
    I have played the trumpet for 3 years so far and i have a question on where is the right place to put your mouth on the mouthpiece. When i play i put my mouth on the top of the mouthpiece with my my upper lip sometimes going above, outside of the mouthpiece cup and when i naturally buzz my lips on how i would play the trumpet i noticed that my upper lip is foward more and my bottom lip is more tucked in. The higher i put my mouth on the mouthpiece the higher i can play but the problem with all of this is i cant really play long, my lips are destroyed after i play for around an hour and i cant play high notes anymore and its real fuzzy and my upper lip especially is the worst. Is there a way i can fix all of this? Oh yeah and when i buzz my lips i notice that the air goes downwards but i sound really good playing like the way i have explained above but again my problem is it destroyes my lips, especially my upper lip and i cant really play anymore. How do i fix this? What should i do? Please help!
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    1....
    The higher i put my mouth on the mouthpiece the higher i can play but the problem with all of this is i cant really play long, my lips are destroyed after i play for around an hour and i cant play high notes anymore and its real fuzzy and my upper lip especially is the worst. Is there a way i can fix all of this?
    Ans. Too much pressure on the mouthpiece. Practice long soft tones, and build your muscles slowly. Rest as long as you play.

    2.....
    Oh yeah and when i buzz my lips i notice that the air goes downwards but i sound really good playing like the way i have explained above but again my problem is it destroyes my lips, especially my upper lip and i cant really play anymore. How do i fix this? What should i do?
    Ans. Too much pressure being used. If your notes cut off, go fuzzy, or just cease to play and turn to air, then you are using too much pressure, or your chops are not strong enough to control your air. Correct body use is essential, and what you have explained is an example that you need some face time with someone who can see you.

    Every person may have a slightly different placement of the mouthpiece, but it depends on you teeth, jaw, facial features like lip thickness etc. We are all different. Now you are starting school next week, and you suck. Nothing will happen with a magic wand. It is about a regular training routine, daily practice every day, that reinforces the development, and a sensible approach.

    My advice - go see a teacher of trumpet.
    If you choose not to take any advice, good on you. But if you don't understand what is being said, then you need more experience with the horn, and playing 3 years and not being able to play an Eb major scales, tells me you are a trumpet owner.....not a player. The players works at it, not just takes it out for the lesson.

    Good luck next week,
     
  8. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    You need to cough up some money and take a few lessons. You don't have to commit yourself for life with a teacher. Just get a good in person evaluation. This is kind of internet advice is highly hypothetical and it's obvious there is a failure to communicate. It seems to me that you need someone who can take a close up look at your embouchure, offer suggestions, and where you can get immediate, real-time interactive feedback.
     
  9. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    I think VB is waiting for a reply from you.... about your chin..
    Maybe answer him. Actually go re-read the whole thread. There are many gems of advice. BUT no-one here can see you play - or hear you.
     
  10. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    trickg, when I went to an Army recruiter, I was trying to cut as good a deal as I could, ref assignment, length of enlistment, etc, as a bandsman. When I told him that I was also looking into the Air Force, without pausing he threw me out of his office, LOL.
     

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