Very important question

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Easytrumpet, Aug 9, 2015.

  1. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    ET, I'm not sure what you expect here. You've come to us with a question, have told us you are having problems, and have told us that you've only played for 3 years. No one, and I mean NO ONE, can "fix" your embouchure problem with some sort of trick or sage words of advice that are all of a sudden going to take your chops and fix them inside of the 3 weeks you seem to be expecting. I've got news for you - if you are having issues with your Eb scale today due to some embouchure issues, you're probably going to still have some embouchure issues after school starts, regardless of what anyone here says - Like Peter McNeill said, no one can wave a magic wand and make your chops do something.

    Here's the simple truth - you need to work at it. Period. For most things related to learning to play a musical instrument, you need to put in a lot of focused time in the practice room, and I'm not talking an hour or two a day for a couple of weeks, I'm talking an hour or two a day for several years to develop, and then for the rest of your life if you expect to maintain it.

    There are a lot of people in this thread, myself included, who have made their living, or are making money with their horns, and there is a reason for that - we've put in the time to develop our chops, technique and musicianship to a point where we can. I know in my case, while certain things did come naturally for me to a certain degree, I also put in thousands of hours in the practice room and in rehearsals, and that was before I took my screening audition to get into the Army band program back in the autumn of 1988. Since then I've put in quite a bit more time. Right now I'm typing this to you from my practice room where I've just gotten done playing long tones as part of my warmup - long tones that help to maintain strength and focus in my embouchure so I can continue to get paid for gigging. I practice what I preach.

    I apologize if the wonderful advice you've received all throughout this thread wasn't quite what you wanted to hear, but you might want to take a few minutes to re-read this thread, reconsider what has been said, and apply some of it - especially that bit about getting a private teacher to guide you through some of the stuff you'll need to do in order to better develop your chops.
     
  2. Easytrumpet

    Easytrumpet New Friend

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    I re-read this thread 3 times and i understand what you guys are saying, there's no question about it. But i'm just wondering if i should switch from the way i play now to the way so you can hold a pencil in your mouth straight... right now if i put the pencil in my mouth it is going downwards on my current embouchure but i play really good this way and have really good range. So...the big question is...should i switch?
     
  3. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    Should you switch? How's it working for you so far?
     
  4. Easytrumpet

    Easytrumpet New Friend

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    How's what working for me?
     
  5. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    Don't worry about the pencil for now.
    "right now if i put the pencil in my mouth it is going downwards on my current embouchure but i play really good this way and have really good range. So...the big question is...should i switch?"


    Don't switch...
    Until you have a real teacher to guide you face to face, play where it is comfortable for you, and where you get the best tone and best endurance. Then just practice.
     
  6. Easytrumpet

    Easytrumpet New Friend

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    But i do play good this way i just don't have good endurance
     
  7. Easytrumpet

    Easytrumpet New Friend

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    I will continue to play this way for the next year and i will switch over next summer if i need to...
     
  8. Easytrumpet

    Easytrumpet New Friend

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    Thanks for all your help
     
  9. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    They've said it, but it worth reiterating, the placement of the mouthpiece varies from player to player dependent on their facial an dental structure, but I'll add that there is no "golden rule" where this is and it resolves itself in time up, down, right or left where the mouthpiece is comfortable and gives you the best tone, and yes the choice of mouthpiece enters the equation but that isn't cause to change mouthpieces, as all they'll do ... possibly, but not always ... is make your task easier and perhaps more comfortable. I don't like a Bach 7C but I can "make do" with one and just about any other. The manufactures state the range of trumpets / cornets. from F# on the 4th line of the bass clef to the Bb above the treble clef. Well, I've yet to see any trumpet/cornet music scored with that F# and surmise that about 90% plus trumpet-cornet music will be scored lower than that Bb. Any who need to play higher needs to learn to also play a piccolo trumpet IMO, and yet there are those who persist in attaining such, especially so in jazz improvisation and usually they are small combos where no instrument otherwise can reach the notes called for. I don't focus on specific scales whereas when I play the full range of the instrument chromatically I've played them all, and this is my personal warm-up. Too, I've not encountered any music that trumpets-cornets play consistently for an hour without a pause or rest, and thus I don't expect a student to play more than 1/2 hour without a like rest as during the latter I discuss or demonstrate, and that too is my personal regimen, and with COPD now, I stick to it.
     
  10. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    There are all kinds of embouchures and horn angles due to those embouchures. Part of it is due to the physical attributes of the player with the way their teeth are set up, along with how their jaw is set up. Don't switch to something else because you think it doesn't look right or somehow doesn't seem to work with the pencil exercise. You don't play a pencil - you play a trumpet. The pencil exercise can help some people, but it's not for everyone. Personally, I've spent probably less than 5 minutes of the last 34 years since I started playing trumpet working with a pencil between my lips. (I have done it, but it was never something I approached with any kind of regularity.)

    At your stage of the game, systematically working your fundamentals are the ticket to success, and that needs to be done with the chops setup that feels right to you - not what you think looks right.

    With that said, a few lessons with a trumpet teacher might not be a bad idea. If you do have a chops issue, they can deal with it there and get you going in the right direction, and that's not something any of us here online can do, simply put, because we can't see or hear you play.
     

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