Vibrato help.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Jazzy816, Dec 3, 2014.

  1. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Keep in mind that I never said that a person shouldn't use a recording as a frame of reference, only that one shouldn't try too hard to emulate in a very specific way. I use recordings ALL THE TIME. It's part of how I practice because my band plays charts in the original keys and arrangements for what you hear on the radio. For me it's as simple as pulling the tune up in iTunes, pulling the chart up on my iPad, and then playing along. This is a valuable tool when it comes to phrasing, inflection, articulation style, etc. But with that said, I'm not trying to specifically emulate a particular sound when I do it - I kind of do my own thing with it, within the context of the tune of course.

    To illustrate a couple of examples, when we (on the rare occasion) play, "The Hustle," the bandleader thinks it's funny and enjoys it (actually requests it!) when I play that trumpet solo with really exaggerated vibrato. (EDIT: I just pulled this tune up and listened to it - that player does use a real big vibrato, but I approach the line a bit differently than he did, and my vibrato is even bigger! :D) Likewise, when we do "Ring of Fire" (it's funny how well a Johnny Cash tune will hit on a first set) that's another song that gets a really exaggerated vibrato, but what I do with it is mine - I'm not trying to sound like the original trumpet players.

    In contrast, when we do "Tijuana Taxi" I don't do quite as much of the inflection that those guys did. I do some of it, but again, it's kind of my own thing within the context of the tune. (As a side note to that, at one point I didn't give Herb Alpert his due as a player - those Tijuana Brass songs are not nearly as easy to play as those guys make them sound.)

    So I'll agree with Kehaulani about listening to the recordings for inspiration, but remember the context of your particular playing situation - a High School Musical. Your pit is not going to sound like a Broadway pit orchestra - it won't have the experience or depth of talent across the board. With that in mind, even if you match the style of the recording and just nail that vibrato just like the recording, is it really going to matter or will anyone really care, or will it enhance the performance overall?

    I guess what I'm saying is to do your best, but don't get wrapped up in the details that may not matter until you get a good hold on the details that will.
     
  2. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    Holy Cow! I jokingly call myself a musical prostitute, but if "Ring of Fire", Tijuana Taxi" and "The Hustle" were indicative of the kind of programming I'd have to play, I think I'd slit my throat. :lol:
     
  3. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    At current count there are 585 charts in my "book" on my iPad, and that's only what has been arranged for horn. There are nearly 800 charts total and nothing is off limits. I used those as extreme examples. Yeah, some of them are a bit hokey, but I make good money to play whatever is called.

    We're also doing charts as current as "Bang Bang" and "Shake it Off," both of which are fun and do well with the crowd.

    First sets are pretty much music to be ignored by. After that, anything goes to keep the crowd on the floor, and we do a lot of jobs where the song list for the night has been hand selected by the bride and groom, and we don't get a lot of latitude.
     
  4. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    IMO, "Bang, Bang" is a lot more sophisticated than meets the eye. Very cool song. My favourite versions have been Gabor Szabo, and whoever did it on the "Kill Bill" soundtrack. BUT . . .have you heard Lady Gaga's version (on the PBS Great Performances) with Tony Bennett? A very hip take on the song. Are you familiar with it?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-huNrHAou-E


    Which is, after all, what it's all about. (Well, almost all. I'd still die a million deaths if I had to play "Ring of Fire" :evil:.)
     
  5. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    We're talking about two completely different songs. The "Bang Bang" I'm referring to is Jessie J, Ariana Grande and Nicki Minaj. :D

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0HDdjwpPM3Y

    It's one of the hookiest songs I've ever played, but I wouldn't exactly call it sophisticated. LOL!

    Ring of Fire was added back when we were still doing show bits and we had a guy who would dress up as Johnny Cash. My bits were Buddy Holly (depending on the night, Peggy Sue, That'll Be the Day or Rave On) and Roy Orbison. (Pretty Woman)

    I used to LOATHE the show bits - particularly the Buddy Holly because not only did I have to dress up as Buddy, complete with glasses with no lenses and the white dinner jacket and bow tie, but I also had to "play" a guitar, which originally had strings, but later the strings were removed. It was just a cheap beater Squier Stratocaster that was no longer playable, and being used as a prop kept it out of the wood pile.

    The things we do to play for pay! Hahaha!
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Hand Vibrato = Next Business Day
    Jaw Vibrato = 5 Working Days
    Body Vibrato = A Lifetime

    The fastest way to learn is to play duets with someone that already has a beautiful vibrato. Radiation treatment seems to be the best medicine.
     
  7. edfitzvb

    edfitzvb Forte User

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    Trickg, I understand completely. I have been Diana Ross, John Revolting, Music Man (a super-hero in music that comes from a planet way, way "out there," etc.) I have played Tijuana Brass, countless Motown R&B charts, movie themes, TV theme songs and commercials, pretty much anything I was paid for. I did so because it paid the bills. I make no apologies.
     
  8. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Am I an anomaly? I have never thought too hard about vibrato or how to produce it - for me it has always been something I just do without much thought about it, and I'm talking clear back in middle school or early high school when I first started to use vibrato. I've never been one to use hand vibrato personally, not that it shouldn't be done - if it's good enough for Doc Severinsen then there must be something correct about it.
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Patrick,

    the beauty of life on earth is that there are infinite talents spread among almost infinite people. WE are very lucky for any talent that we become acquainted with. For some, the beauty is physical, mechanical, technical. For others there is a core and then the packaging. Some just "get" vibrato, full sound, golden brilliance. It is not common or seldom, but it is a gift. My time approximations are based on something tangeable however. With a student, the hand vibrato in minimal invasive and can be learned in a very short period of time. Coordination of the jaw takes a bit more and the body vibrato is never quite finished. I believe it is the most expressive and personal of all. 2 notes and you know if it Maurice André, Satchmo, Mèndéz, Dizzy or Jon Faddis for instance!

     
  10. -C-

    -C- Pianissimo User

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    Same here. I guess I fit in the jaw vibrato category but never thought all that much about it.
     

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