Vibrato

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by music matters, Mar 23, 2005.

  1. music matters

    music matters Pianissimo User

    219
    1
    Apr 26, 2004
    ON Canada
    Dear Manny,

    I have always played with very little vibrato as I always liked a very pure straight sound. When I use vibrato to colour/warm the tone I use a slight vertical movement of my trumpet to regulate it, as for me I find this easier, and it sounds more musical than using my lips, which are very used to plying with no vibrato.

    However, I know that many players do not use this technique and use their lips. When I am teaching my students some naturally have a lovely vibrato, but for those that don't who need to develop this skill, which method do you think is best to teach to them? I have been encouraging them to try both ways to see which works/sounds best for them and then go with that, but is one method better in your opinion than the other, and how would you approach teaching students how to play with vibrato?

    Best regards,

    Graham.
     
  2. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

    5,915
    10
    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    Dear Graham,

    Interestingly, my vibrato didn't develop until I became acquainted with the recordings of Rafael Mendez. It "happend" without me realizing the importance of what I was doing, how it would become such a part of my sound. Had I been English, someone probably would have put a pickaxe in my hand, sent me to the mines, and signed me up to play in one of the brass bands!

    In today's world with people travelling everywhere to play it seems important to teach kids the importance of doing all three things when they're ready: The beauty of the vibrato/non-vibrato sounds and vibrato by manipulation.

    I recently had a discussion with a colleague about the hand vibrato and he said what you did: that there was less interference with the embouchure. I tried it and could do it but didn't feel natural after all these years of the vocal style vibrato. There are so many great players that do both things, Graham, that I think your instinct with what each individual student would respond to best should be trusted.

    My caution is that you might wait and see what each student develops on their own and once they achieve a comfort level with what they do, expose them to the "other side", whichever that may be.

    If you have a kid that plays with a nice vibrato, make sure they get to hear old records of John Lang and that crew. If the student has a non-vibrato sound, expose them to Philip McCann or Maurice Murphy. See what develops.

    ML
     
  3. music matters

    music matters Pianissimo User

    219
    1
    Apr 26, 2004
    ON Canada
    Dear Manny,

    Thank you very much for your help and advice - it is much appreciated.

    Best regards,

    Graham.
     

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