Vibrato....

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by crowmadic, May 29, 2007.

  1. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 3, 2006
    Care to share your technique for vibrato? I know what works best for the individual is what's best. But I thought the correct technique is using some type of wrist action not lip movement, or any other head mouth related movement. Please share your method here. Thanks.........tom
     
  2. heck99

    heck99 Pianissimo User

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    May 29, 2007
    Greetings. I use a both hand and jaw vibrato, depending on how I want it to sound. I'll experiment on a piece using both types to see which sounds/feels the best to my ears. I was never taught formal vibrato by instructors in the past, so I've figured out vibrato myself to some degree.
     
  3. trumpetgeek01

    trumpetgeek01 New Friend

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    My teacher first taught me lip vibrado. I've tried both the lip and hand vibrato and I am partial to the lip vibrato. What my teacher told me to do was play a midrange note (I chose G) and just sort of went wa wa wa wa (4 quarters,then 8 8ths, 4 sets of triplets). It really helped me get the basic idea.
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    This thread was covered a while ago:
    http://www.trumpetmaster.com/vb/f132/vibrato-34356.html#post303781

    The bottom line is learn both ways, they sound different and fit in different venues. Playing convincingly WITHOUT vibrato is also important! You then need additional tools for expression - articulation, dynamics and microdynamics, rubato - that all work with vibrato too!
     
  5. tromj

    tromj Piano User

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    I drink a lot of coffee until I get the appropriate tremor.
    Then all is well.


    Jordan
     
  6. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Whatever the method used to produce it, vibrato should be instinctive rather than automatic. Saxophonists have a wonderful exercise that entails practicing a set number of vibrations per beat. This develops control over the speed, and can help to avoid the binary vibrato (on or off) that plagues some players. The jaw vibrato, greatly and grossly exagerated, is also a great way to build chops while practicing long tones. Have fun!
     
  7. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 3, 2006
    I'll be trying hand, lip, and jaw vibratos to become familiar with their differences. I like "instinctive rather than automatic" Vulgano. I'm thinking "instinctive" works only for soloing, and not as part of a section unless the music specifies it.........yes?
     
  8. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

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    rowuk, As usual, I should have searched this topic first. But Vulgano's reply offered something not found in the other thread.......thanks
     
  9. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Some esoteric stuff here (brought to my attention by a trombone player, no less, who as a rule find bib overalls esoteric) in which the principal plays without vibrato, but the 2nd (or 3rd) with a subtle vibrato, giving a shimmering effect to a chord. Fun stuff to try out during after-hours rehearsals.
     
  10. amuk

    amuk New Friend

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    May 22, 2007
    Doc Reinhart, famous chops intructor (see "Pivot Systom"), always strongly advised against using jaw or lip vibrato and to stick with hand vibrato. He said that the other modes tend to destabilize the embouchure leading to problems down the road. He also advised against diaphagmatic vibrato (he called it a "nannie goat") because once it was learned it was almost impossible to shut off.
    Gilbert Johnson (Philadelphia Orchestra) always used hand vibrato while I was his student.
     

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