Vintage jazz and blues enthusiam

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Curtscornet, Apr 8, 2015.

  1. Curtscornet

    Curtscornet New Friend

    1
    4
    Apr 6, 2015
    Oxnard CA
    I've played cornet with a vintage jazz and blues band for almost three years. Most of our gigs are in places that cater to an older (40+) crowd, but we've been booked at three places lately (Hollywood, Ventura, Santa Monica) that cater to the 25-35 crowd. It surprises me that these people love our music. They stay for 2-3 sets, dance, cheer us on and make a point of telling how much they like the music. Most of our repertoire comes from the 20s and 30s, and is upbeat. Anyone else out there experiencing this?
     
  2. ChopsGone

    ChopsGone Forte User

    1,841
    567
    Jan 26, 2009
    Northern California
    Here in the Bay Area, the audiences tend to be mostly older, lots of people in their 70's and above. But there are always a few younger people attending. With a festival, the percentage of younger people increases. Some of the local dance clubs have younger members who will attend trad jazz events as well. And, of course, some of the musicians themselves are high school or college age - some pretty good groups made up exclusively of younger players. At least one of the local societies sponsors a few younger players' attendance at summer Dixieland camps. Can't hurt.
     
  3. SAS

    SAS Pianissimo User

    154
    57
    Jan 7, 2015
  4. sj3209

    sj3209 Piano User

    290
    190
    Nov 22, 2006
    Amador County, Calif.
    I would love to see more early jazz. But sadly the bop folks just keeping flogging the donkey and when that doesn't sell, the club books some folk types or other non-jazz music. I should explain that flogging the donkey is my term for beating a dead horse. More clubs close or shift to other types of music because people don't get the music. They all seem to get the early jazz just fine. Listen to Hot Sardines and Tumbledown House.
     
  5. robrtx

    robrtx Mezzo Forte User

    890
    709
    May 26, 2012
    Hawaii

    Thank you for that clarification...........:shock:
     
  6. gordonfurr1

    gordonfurr1 Forte User

    2,107
    1,091
    Aug 2, 2010
    North Carolina
    Better than some monkey.
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,108
    9,262
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    First of all, welcome to TM Curtscornet. Here in Dayton, Dave Grier's Jazz Stompers sounds to be the same kind of band. They do very well here in Dayton, while my Blue Note style jazz band, not so much.
     
  8. limepickle

    limepickle Piano User

    268
    172
    Aug 30, 2013
    Dallas, TX
    double
     
  9. limepickle

    limepickle Piano User

    268
    172
    Aug 30, 2013
    Dallas, TX
    I couldn't agree with you more sj. With so many bop musicians dominating the scene, the public's perception
    of jazz is distorted. I had the pleasure of meeting with Kenny Burrell several times,
    and he said that the greatness of Duke Ellington was in being able to make his compositions musically sophisticated
    and fresh without it becoming inaccessible to the general population. Generally, early jazz maintains a
    coherent, comprehensible form without sacrificing musical integrity, whereas new bop is more analogous to postmodern art;
    it's difficult to understand sometimes unless you are involved in that scene. We need more people exposed
    to early swing and even hard bop rather than only to the spiritual descendants of the bebop movement.
     
  10. SAS

    SAS Pianissimo User

    154
    57
    Jan 7, 2015
    Someone will come along and change the perception of jazz at some point and I think the Millennials will love it...but they will have to be sold on it. My teenage son listens to Ben Howard. That is the kind of soft music I would have never gone near at his age. Musical tastes have changed and will continue to change as rock and all the guitar we've heard for four decades gets stale.
     

Share This Page