Vintage Olds Trumpet Removable Bell

Discussion in 'Vintage Trumpets / Cornets' started by study888, Sep 8, 2005.

  1. study888

    study888 Mezzo Forte User

    Age:
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    Aug 22, 2005
    Darlington S.C.
    Hello. This horn is being auctioned on e-bay on the OLDS trumpet site. Item# is 7349180578. Any clues are ideas as to the maker. Never seen one with a detachable bell. Can a horn with a break in section like that still give a good trumpet sound? Just wondering since better horns are supposed to be one piece hand hammered bell. :?:
     
  2. oldlou

    oldlou Forte User

    Age:
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    Aug 28, 2005
    Grand Rapids, Mi.
    Two piece bell

    I have no clue as to the maker of the subject trumpet, but I do know that Getzen made some really fine cornets and trumpets that were of two piece construction in a similar joint location that were acclaimed for their fine playing propensity. These were their Deluxe and Super Deluxe models. I have one of each and like them both very much. I do prefer the Super Deluxe with it's copper bell and tone ring. It seems to have a darker more resonsive tone and seems to slot a bit better.

    OLDLOU>>
     
  3. Robert Rowe

    Robert Rowe Mezzo Piano User

    513
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    Dec 24, 2004
    I have the Reynolds version of the horn, designated as "Ranger". It plays very nicely, and has good tone. I recently brought it to the Baltimore "Trumpet Fest". Those who played it agreed.

    Robert Rowe
     
  4. Happy Canuck

    Happy Canuck Piano User

    274
    35
    Oct 31, 2003
    Toronto, ON Canada
    The seller states "Most likely to be made by Olds", I very much doubt it!

    It's not the Pinto/Ranger, totally different, very low end student horns.

    I'd stay away!
     
  5. Robert Rowe

    Robert Rowe Mezzo Piano User

    513
    7
    Dec 24, 2004
    Bill (Happy Canuck) --

    What can you tell us about the OLDS Pinto / Reynolds Ranger?

    I, for one, have a Ranger; and, it seems to be a pretty darn nice horn. I don't know the genesis of the design, or the engineering concept that inspired it. The "modular" construction was way "before it's time" ... and seems to have been abandoned. I suspect marketing was next-to-nothing, or, non-existant.

    For those of you unfamiliar with these amazing instruments, the mouthpipe (leadpipe) and bell-section are detachable from the valve-block, via ferruled-braces; also, the 1st and 3rd slides are inter-changeable. Last, but not least, the valves are interchaneable! The valve-block itself is encased with durable nylon, I believe, ... not plastic. This assembly cannot be removed; although, the caps unscrew as with standard horns. The build-quality is excellent; fit and finish are very fine.

    A definite "pawn-shop prize", at around $100 (US).

    Robert Rowe
     
  6. tom turner

    tom turner Mezzo Forte User

    779
    11
    Oct 25, 2003
    Georgia, USA
    Hi,

    The Olds and Reynolds horns called the Pinto and Ranger were designed to make repairing student horns a snap . . . with their robust modular construction.

    Alas, the handwriting was already on the wall. After Selmer bought out Bach in '61, and mass-produced "Strads" started showing up in all the "guitar stores" in America, all the school kids wanted a Bach Strad trumpet . . . NOT a Conn/King/Olds/Reynolds/Holton, etc. cornet. So . . . these horns could not save Reynolds and Olds from impending oblivion.

    [NOTE: Bach made custom-built horns . . . and only made about 5,500 instruments in his 36 years in business (1924-1960). That quickly changed under Selmer.]

    By the early '70s the proud old firms selling the great cornets were gone. Olds and Reynolds, as will as Conn and King, all made valiant attempts at throwing some new models out there . . . primarily TRUMPET models . . . but the Selmer-Bach had begun to rule the day . . . and the old firms sold out, as Selmer-Bach took the place of the other makers as the preferred horn for students.

    Sadly, there's not a high school band program on the planet, IMHO, that wouldn't benefit if their trumpeters played the slightly richer-sounding cornets . . . but that's another issue altogether.

    The Pinto and Ranger were never designed to be state-of-the-art pro horns . . . but rather as modular student horns where parts could be replaced easily! It is still an interesting idea too! From the sound of you owners, these horns seemed to be just what the doctor ordered!

    Tom
     
  7. Happy Canuck

    Happy Canuck Piano User

    274
    35
    Oct 31, 2003
    Toronto, ON Canada
    Robert, if you have a good Ranger/Pinto you are very, very lucky.

    These, as Tom has already mentioned, were student horns. Easy to fix the components, never have to worry about the valves, they are all the same. BUT, it was Olds' lowest end horn, check out the price list here
    http://rouses.net/trumpet/olds73/olds73price2.htm

    I have heard stories of the valve cluster exploding!

    When they appear on eBay the normally don't make $100!
     
  8. Robert Rowe

    Robert Rowe Mezzo Piano User

    513
    7
    Dec 24, 2004
    Tom & Bill --

    Thanks for the info!

    ... and Bill: I shall try to find a "flak-jacket" and shooter's glasses when playing "Carnival of Venice", especially that chromatic-run up to the high "A" !

    Regards,
    Robert Rowe
     
  9. contempora

    contempora New Friend

    48
    0
    Jan 17, 2005
    Burnsville, MN
    Alan Rouse has some notes on the Olds Central site from Chuck Madere, who worked at Olds when they made the Pinto/Ranger.

    http://rouses.net/trumpet/WorkingAtOlds62-72.html

    Comments on the model are about halfway through the article.
     
  10. oldlou

    oldlou Forte User

    Age:
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    Aug 28, 2005
    Grand Rapids, Mi.
    Rreplaceable bells

    I recently read that Olds, in their attempt to stay in business in the early seventies made a few trumpets with exchangeable bells. The story goes that this was done to allow some of the top professionals to try various bell tapers, flares, materials and thicknesses. The attempt was, sorry to say, a total failure. I truly believe that the horn that was for sale was in fact one of those test horns.

    OLDLOU>>
     

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