Violin study

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Pisarenko, Jan 8, 2012.

  1. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    And another thing ... about the violins. The Strads are mostly being stored and not played. Any finely constructed string instrument is going to go dull (sounding) in storage. Not the fairest of tests to put up one that's been locked away for years against one that's being played daily (and is tweaked by technicians). There's a lot more to a test like this than just putting a few of these ancient relics together with a few players.

    For the trumpet, I think there's still room for improvement. How about a tone control? Some sort of knob that dials you out of "dark, smokey jazz" and into "bright, cutting, lead". :dontknow:

    Or, how about an FM radio (the whole trumpet makes a great antenna), for those times when you'd really like to tune out the conductor?

    All sorts of potential improvements are available for the R&D teams.


    Turtle
     
  2. Phil986

    Phil986 Forte User

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    Are you sure about that? Some certainly are museum pieces. However, I was under the impression that these instruments are bought by individuals or foundations who then derive significant income from leasing them to qualified musicians. Said musicians have themselves a variety of options such as sponsorship or grants in order to have access to them. I would think that anyone owning a strad who has a business sense would want to put it to work. In addition, people with the means who decide to invest in such instruments are likely to have a thing for music and should be enclined to let the instruments be played. I must say I don't know any source summarizing how many ancient Italian instruments exist vs. how many are "in activity."
     
  3. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    Well, at least 3!
     
  4. Solar Bell

    Solar Bell Moderator Staff Member

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    Here is a picture I took of my friend (on the left) with her Strad, the Marquis De Rivera, and a local violinist who was recording with it.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Phil,

    No, I'm not sure that more Strads are in storage than being played. Leasing them out sounds like good business, but the insurance must be steep.


    Turtle
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    We can't ignore that the "ideal" trumpet tone is a moving target. We also can't ignore that the partials in a brass instrument are mathematically related and THAT makes them out of tune with a well tempered scale. There are techniques to bandaid the intonation issues and the bandaids have gotten better. I think that Yamaha deserves the most credit here for improving the playing characteristics for all levels of horns. Those horns will also become vintage on day and I am sure in 50 years, the current "Bach" standard will no longer be the status quo.

    Stradivari/Guaneri violins have been the goal for 300 years. There is no arguments there.
     
  7. Phil986

    Phil986 Forte User

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    This recent NYT story gives some perspective on that. Very telling are the words of the aging Mr Greenhouse's family about him not being able to tell the difference between his beloved Countess and a recent copy, albeit itself a magnificent instrument, for sure. Interesting read in any case.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/15/m...house-cello.html?scp=1&sq=stradivarius&st=cse
     
  8. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    I think most people, and especially a musician, can tell that there is a difference between one instrument and another.... they just just can't often identify which is which!
     
  9. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Actually, I have wondered if brass and the other metals that trumpets may be made out of might also change with time. I don't think there is any question that wood (plant) ages over time. However, I bet some of the metal experts will say the same happens for metal. Guess my Olds Ambassador just gets better and better. :)
     
  10. Phil986

    Phil986 Forte User

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