Warm-up Routine and the Stamp book.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by m13a8, Nov 22, 2009.

  1. m13a8

    m13a8 Pianissimo User

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    Oct 27, 2007
    Hey everybody!
    I hear tons of talk on these forums about having a "proper warm-up routine" established. I've been trying to start all my practice sessions with long tones, lip slurrs, and then all Major and Dorian scales (as I am currently working to internalize the Dorian scales to help me begin learning improv). I've heard that the Stamp warm-up book is a great one so I've ordered it. Of course, it is taking for stinkin ever to get to me.

    So I guess the real question is: "What else can I add to my warm-up routine to make it more effective?" The only real method books I have to work out of are Clarke's Characteristic Studies and a good old copy of Arbans. What warm-up routines do you guys use?
     
  2. tromj

    tromj Piano User

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    There are some really good books by David Hickman that incorporate use of Flow Studies, lip bending, and pedals. I am not sure how to order them since he doesn't publish all his own stuff, but I am sure someone here can put you in the right direction
     
  3. actionjackson06de

    actionjackson06de New Friend

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    Nov 22, 2009
    University of North Texas
    An important aspect of warming up that many players neglect is breathing. I know, warming up the breath sounds like bull, but it really does make a difference and it will get you in the habit of taking full, dark breaths every time.

    I always start my warmup with my Breathbuilder for a few minutes, then some simple tunes on the mouthpiece. Then Cichowicz flow studies #3, Clark #2 in the low register, and some Stamp. To warm up the tongue, you can use the Clark #2 exercises with different articulation combinations.
     
  4. TrumpetLucian

    TrumpetLucian Pianissimo User

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    May 7, 2009
    Indiana
    There are tons of the worlds best players that use the Stamp methods, from Chris Tedesco to Malcolm McNab (Can't forget about Wayne Bergeron too)

    If you've ordered the Stamp, I suggest getting the Porper book that dissects and explains more about his method. I use the Stamp exercises daily, and highly recommend them!
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    m13a8,
    slow down a bit. First of all a daily routine is a reality check. It needs no more than breathing exercizes, long tones, slurs and some basic articulation. By then you know what the rest of the day is going to be like. This can and should be a very compact, preferably memorized activity. Once you are through this then you add the things to get better as needed.

    I do not warm up and never really have.
    I use a hymnbook for lots of tunes, Arban, Clarke, Schlossberg and St Jacome. All of the method books really have mostly the same stuff, just grouped differently.

    It doesn't matter how many books that you have. One would be enough if you have a decent instructor and patience and ambition.
     
  6. B15M

    B15M Forte User

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    Monroe Ct.
    What is a Flow study?
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Flow studies are the opposite of articulation. They are etudes designed to "keep the air moving". I think that it is an attempt to apply Newtons Law (objects in motion tend to stay that way) to trumpet playing.

    There are many different takes on how they should be used. For players obscessed with sound, it in fact does mean that articulation is watered down to "keep the air flowing". Better players use it to find a more relaxed method of producing sound. Articulation does in fact stop the flow, so I believe the use of these studies must be balanced with each other.
     
  8. actionjackson06de

    actionjackson06de New Friend

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    Nov 22, 2009
    University of North Texas

    Are you suggesting that good or great players aren't obSessed with sound? Actually, the best players are the best because, among other things, they have a great sound. I don't care if you can play a quadruple-high C and triple tongue at 240 bpm, if you've got a bad sound you're not going to get very far.

    Flow studies are usefull because they take away everything except the air and the sound so that you can focus on and perfect them for when you add all the other elements such as articulation and range.
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    AJ06,
    that is not what I said. What is missing in many players with great sound is the matching great articulation. Staccatos are not short and sharp, legato tonguing is not audible, other attacks are reduced to a weak D instead of a clean T.

    Just like with speaking, communication requires articulation. Flow studies MUST be balanced with EQUALLY important articulation studies.

    Why is everyone in awe of Rafael Mendez' playing? Sergei Nakariakov? Al Vizzuti? It certainly is not because of dooo, dooo, dooo!

    When comparing name brand US symphonic recordings to European ones, differences in articulation becomes immediately apparent as does sound. Maybe due to all of the various languages here in Europe, articulation plays a MUCH larger role, even for the casual player.
     
  10. dizforprez

    dizforprez Forte User

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    Nov 2, 2003
    Rowuk,

    In addition to language I wonder if their extended use of rotary trumpet also has something to do with it....To me that is what flow study etudes help devlop, that smooth connected sound that people that spend a lot of time playing rotary already have in their playing.
     

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