Warm-up Routine and the Stamp book.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by m13a8, Nov 22, 2009.

  1. dhbailey

    dhbailey Piano User

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    Jul 28, 2009
    New Hampshire
    Regarding the Stamp book, I attended Roy Proper's workshop at ITG in Harrisburg, which was a real eye-opener. He said that Stamp insisted that his students do his exercises along with the piano for intonation. What he didn't say, but in my work with the Stamp book along with digesting what Proper says in his book (I second the idea that you should buy that one as well -- there's also another book explaining the Stamp stuff but I haven't bought that one yet, also published by BIM) I have thought about -- playing along with Stamp at the piano would have controlled the timing. I mention this because the book comes with a play-along CD and I have been doing that ever since ITG this past May and it has made all the difference in the world in my playing.

    So play the exercises (including the lips-only and the mouthpiece-only work) along with the CD, do them every day and you'll soon notice a huge improvement in many aspects of your playing.

    Another exercise I have stumbled upon is the Reinhardt "Pivot Stabilizer" as published in Rich Willey's edition of The Reinhardt Routines. Essentially this is an exercise, entirely in whole notes, where you start on 2nd line G, all lip slurs, no tonguing even to start the sound, and slur down to written middle C and back up to G, then rest for 4 beats and repeat it. Then repeat that process with 2nd valve, 1st valve, and 1&2. Then widen that interval to be 3rd-space C down to middle C, and repeat with the same valve combinations. Then widen more, top-space E down to middle C and repeat the valve combinations. Then widen more to above-the-staff-G down to middle C. Once that is completed, change the contour to: 3rd-space C down to middle C up to high C and repeat that with no valves, then repeat that process with the same valve combinations. Then, if you can, slur 3rd-space C down to middle C up to E above high C, and repeat the same process and same valves. And finally, if you can, widen it to be 3rd-space C down to middle C and up to G above high C and repeat the whole process with that contour.

    It may well not be for everybody, but the whole process takes about 10 minutes and I find that in combination with the Stamp exercises, my range is getting higher and my tone quality (for the first time ever) is staying much more consistent, and I'm also finding that notes which formerly created a mental block for me (A above the staff and higher) are now simply notes to be played and I'm able to concentrate on the music much better.
     
  2. frankmike

    frankmike Piano User

    440
    16
    Dec 5, 2008
    start on G and than descending half tone while shifting 1st and 2nd paritals

    like this:

    T T T (2nd parital), T T T(1st parital)

    breath

    T _ T (2nd), T _ T (1st)

    breath

    _ T T (2nd), _ T T (1st)

    breath

    _ _T (2nd), _ _ T (1st)

    breath

    T _ _ (2nd), T _ _ (1st)

    breath

    _ T _ (2nd), _ T _ (1st)

    breath

    _ _ _ (2nd), _ _ _ (1st)
     
  3. B15M

    B15M Forte User

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    Dec 30, 2003
    Monroe Ct.
    What will this do for me?
     
  4. frankmike

    frankmike Piano User

    440
    16
    Dec 5, 2008
    it will warm your chops up
     
  5. mchs3d

    mchs3d Mezzo Forte User

    988
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    Sep 30, 2005
    Provo, UT
    Warm-up routine should basically be something that shakes off the dust and starts a new day. I would say that you should start with something that feels really good. Pitch bends are one of the best things to start with. Stamp is good too. Here are the books I use for warm-up (some more than others on different days):

    - James Stamp Method (helps with buzzing/intonation)
    - Schlossberg (really great book for getting those slurs and leaps in check)
    - Clarke Studies (a must have; Clarke believed in moving long tones)
    - Cichowicz Flow Studies (endless supply of moving long tones)
     
  6. m13a8

    m13a8 Pianissimo User

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    Oct 27, 2007
    Wow! Thank all of you for your GREAT input! I can't wait to try some of these suggestions later today :-).

    Frankmike, I'm kind of confused about your suggestion. What do the Ts and _s signify? I'm also a little confused when you say "shifting first and second partials." Can you please give me a short example of how this warm-up works, note-for-note? Thanks a lot, I appreciate your suggestions :D

    Edit:

    I just tried the "Pivot Stabilizer" and WOW! I feel great! :-D
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2009
  7. B15M

    B15M Forte User

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    Dec 30, 2003
    Monroe Ct.
    And while your explaining, can you really tell me what benefit lip bends do. I can relate to all the other things. I know what they will accomplish and why to use them. I just don't get the lip bend.
     
  8. m13a8

    m13a8 Pianissimo User

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    Oct 27, 2007
    A side question, what do you guys think about breathing tools, like these? AirMax Breatherâ„¢ do they really help? Or do I only really need to do "Breathing Gym" style exercises?
     
  9. frankmike

    frankmike Piano User

    440
    16
    Dec 5, 2008
    thats fingering for eg. T T T on 2nd parital is G (trumpet pitch) F(concert pitch)

    so you play (in concert pitch)

    F2, Bb1, breath, E2, A1, breath, Eb2, Ab1, breath etc. etc...
     
  10. The Dutch Guy

    The Dutch Guy Piano User

    402
    12
    Sep 22, 2008
    Netherlands
    Not sure he gets it.
    What frank means is that the 3 symbols are your valves. T T T means all valves open, and _ _ _ means all valves pressed down. so you would play an A like this _ _ T, and a Bflat like this _ T T
     

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