Warm up routines

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Learningon, Dec 11, 2009.

  1. Keith Fiala

    Keith Fiala Pianissimo User

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    Feb 21, 2007
    Austin, Texas
    I think warming up should be consistent and used for preparing your mind, body, chops, fingers, and air for the task at hand. It doesn't have to be for extended periods of time, but it should be a time that you focus on and not just mindlessly blow / rush through.

    If at all possible, I try to play a bit in the mornings... and I usually start with arpeggiations down into the pedal tones. Then I'll do lip flexibility studies and focus on using my tongue and my air. Just a reminder for myself on what to do and how to properly do it.

    Hope this is a useful contribution... all players are different, and it's best to find a routine that works for each individual.

    Keith Fiala
    Trumpet High Note Help, Trumpet Lessons Online, Beginning Trumpet Lessons, Trumpet Books,
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  2. Hoghorn

    Hoghorn Pianissimo User

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    I do 90% of my warm up off the horn. To me it's more about getting my diaphragm, Blood Pressure, lungs, muscles, BODY ready to play the horn, like an athlete does before he / she goes into play. I do some off the mouthpiece buzzing with this but ONLY to get the compression going. This goes on in the car on the way to play. By the time I get there I get the temp up on my horn / mouthpiece while continuing to work the high compression. So by the time I actually play, the horn is up to temp, and my body is READY to play the horn ! : - ) All I need is a minute on the horn to get the centers and away we go !! Woo Hoo !!!

    Jack
     
  3. tutin_trumpeta

    tutin_trumpeta Pianissimo User

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    Apr 10, 2008
    Hertfordshire, UK
    I have a routine which I try to play at the beginning of the day, altho by the time I get home from work it's generally about lunchtime. This kind of doubles as a warm up and a range extending exercise, it's loosely based on Maggio. Once I have played this I'm set up for the day and only have to run up and down a chromatic scale before a gig. If it's extremely cold I sometimes play a little longer before a gig to warm up the trumpet... However, if for any reason I don't play my routine it's not the end of the world and my lip is still fine if I'm gigging later.
     
  4. Keith Fiala

    Keith Fiala Pianissimo User

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    Feb 21, 2007
    Austin, Texas
    Warming up in the car is a great idea... Maynard told me stories about his Birdland days. He would have an hour or so drive to the club each night and would buzz in the car for that length of time. Doing arpeggios, long tones, and even buzzing a melody or two. But usually by the time he would reach his destination, he was pretty set.

    Other players would start to say "Here comes the trumpeter that needs no warm up!"

    Just thought I'd share...
     
  5. Phil

    Phil Pianissimo User

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    can someone tell me how to delete posts? it made me post twice...
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2009
  6. Phil

    Phil Pianissimo User

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    Jun 7, 2009
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    Warmup is an essential part of playing a brasswind instrument, but there are discrepancies in how long the warmup should be. Being a college music major, I practice a lot, so I spend about 30 minutes warming up for the day. My warmup consists of:
    Breathing exercises: 1-2 minutes
    Lip buzzing: 5 minutes
    Mouthpiece buzzing: 5 minutes
    Fuzz-buzzing: >1 minute
    Cichowicz flow study: 10 minutes
    Stamp staccato control (for tonguing): 10 minutes

    If I'm running late to a gig, I lip buzz in the car for a little bit and mouthpiece buzz for a few minutes when I get there before doing long tone scales.
    Usually, I warm up for 30 minutes if I know I'm going to be playing for several hours, but if I only have one rehearsal or gig to go to and I haven't played at all, it's usually 10-15 minutes long. The shorter the better, don't be like someone I know who warms up for 2 hours every morning.
     
  7. Dark Knight

    Dark Knight Pianissimo User

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    Apr 7, 2010
    Canada
    Warm up confusion

    I was searching TM threads about warm-ups and fortunately found this thread, perhaps I am resurrecting it.

    I am now seven months as a comeback player and a full month with a private teacher. I have written before that she is a military band director.

    She says that she tries to teach to the real world where her band does not get extended warm-ups. She is really emphasizing not getting "addicted to long warm ups." My warm up time has been limited to 3 minutes. However, my chops just don't respond as well with a 3 minute warm-up. Before practice at home or lesson, I am being taught to be satisfied with a couple long tones an arpeggio or two, scaling to middle C or E, then off I go.

    I have been reading the different threads on TM and the warm-ups are similar to what I "used to do" before getting a private teacher, i.e., free buzzing and buzzing with a mouth piece for about a total of 15 to 20 minutes (with lots of rest). I used to love the way my chops responded to the horn when I started scales after these warm-ups.

    Am I feeling the need for extended warm-ups now because I am an older (48 yrs) comeback player? I remember VERY limited warm-ups when I was in band in grade school, much like I am being taught now.

    At any rate, I am confused about warm-ups as it stands now.

    David
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The real thing for professional musicians is that you still have to be able to do a professional job even if all the odds are against you - including no time to warm up.

    Players that won't lose their reputation on a minutes notice quite often benefit from more time. That is simply because the habits have not been built and stored for immediate recall. If you need the time, plan for it. Only you can decide what works. Teaching dependency prevention is a real world advantage.
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
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    The real thing for professional musicians is that you still have to be able to do a professional job even if all the odds are against you - including no time to warm up.

    Players that won't lose their reputation on a minutes notice quite often benefit from more time. That is simply because the habits have not been built and stored for immediate recall. If you need the time, plan for it. Only you can decide what works. Teaching dependency prevention is a real world advantage.
     
  10. reedy

    reedy Piano User

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    Jul 31, 2009
    Wiltshire, UK
    my teacher has got me doing middle C-FF then down to bottom C PP slurs then back upto C FF, then down to the B, Bb, A then i do the 1st 2 pages of vizzuttis new concept for trumpet which 1st ex is slow ish triplets from middle G down to C ( i skip ex1 and do ex2) then il do g, f#, g.......g, f# f g, etc down to bottom C then i do the same but going up from the g.... so g Ab g, g ab a ab g, g ab a Bb a ab g, etc then i do the same on a middle C going upto a G then do it on a bottom C going down to the bottom F# then i go back to the 1st excersice and do ttripplets on bottom C down to F# then il do the pencil for 20-25 seconds after then have a few minutes off then go into the rest of my practice
     

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