warm-up

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by dkruziki, Mar 26, 2005.

  1. dkruziki

    dkruziki New Friend

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    Mar 26, 2005
    Manny,
    When you pick up the horn for the first time of the day, do you feel it is neccessary to practice soft and full dynamics? If you are playing alot of full dynamics on a concert, do you practice full dynamics or do you consistently try to play all dynamics?
    Dylan
     
  2. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Sep 29, 2004
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    Dylan,

    Y'know, that's actually a very timely question as I happened to talk about this with student that came in the other day.

    Often, when people come over, I'll ask for a demonstration of what they like to use for a warm-up. It gives me an idea of what their concepts about the mechanics of playing are all about. Just as often, a student will play a certain thing and when I ask for the reason behind it, there is much of a substantive answer.

    I asked a student why he played so softly for his long tones and s loudly for his slurs and he gave me an answer having to do with some physical aspect of playing that just wasn't necessary in those situations. We got into a discussion about speech and when it's right to shout and when it's right to whisper and for how long. It led to further discaussion about speaking in normal tones and I proposed to him to find his normal "speaking voice" on the trumpet.

    My approach is to warm up like so many singers I've heard that start to sing in their low or mid-low register, with vibrato. My intent is to breathe in such a way as to feed the note I want to play with a well-supported airstream. I see no reason to play in whispered tones not do I advocate waking up the occupants of the next town west of me. A normal "speaking tone" is sufficient. I try to create the freeest sound I can and have that sound "teach" every subsequent note to do the same.

    When I do play in whispered tones, it's because I am playing something that requires me to play for a long time at a fairly slow metronome marking or I do it because it's important to practice quietly.

    As far as dynamics in rehearsal, I always play at the marked dynamic unless it's really really taxing and my show's in a couple of hours. This is rarely ever the case with our schedule. The most taxing show I ever played was a Doc Christmas show from about 5 or 6 years ago.

    Now, in anticipation of the "do you warm down?" question, no, I don't. When I'm done, I'm done. The horn goes in the case and I rub in some Chop Saver. If my lips feel very beat up I'll pop a couple or three aspirin.

    ML
     
  3. DonB.

    DonB. New Friend

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    Feb 26, 2005
    Warm Down

    Manny -

    Hi. Your comment about not warming down, when you're through the horn goes directly into the case.

    After a long practice session playing the gamut in musical range, lots of scales, etudes, etc and the chops are tired, I play some pedal tone exercises written by David Baldwin. I find they relax both me and the lips.

    What thin you about that? And what's your opinion about playing pedal tone exercises for embouchure development and building range?

    Don Olmsted
     
  4. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Don,

    I can't really opine because I don't do them. Oh, I mess around with them every once in a while just to see what's up with it but it's not any part of my approach. I've heard many lead players do them and I've heard a variety of rationale in favor of using pedals as a part of the daily routine. Still, I haven't been convinced they will make me better or worse. So, I stay away from them and any commentary about them. I guess when they become a regular part of orchestral technique I'll be forced to learn how to do them. I've built my endurance and range without them, to answer your last question.


    ML
     
  5. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

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    Nov 19, 2003
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    Let me chime in.
    I studied with Sigmund Hering, Sam Krauss, Gil Johnson and Nathan Prager. There was no mention of pedal tones at any of my lessons. Krauss and Hering studied with Saul Caston, who along with Nathan Prager studied with Schlossberg. Gil Johnson studied with Hering and Krauss.
    Not a pedal tone in the bunch :cool:

    Wilmer
     
  6. DonB.

    DonB. New Friend

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    Feb 26, 2005
    Pedal Tones

    Been away from this thread for a while. Not to belabor this subject, I studied with Ron Hasselman in 1979-80 and he introduced me to the pedal tone exercises. I got so I could play one octave down (below the staff) with ease and good tone. Helped for sure to develop my wind capacity and control. Also to relax the chops when they tire. For upper range practice I go low-middle-high-pedal throughout the scale. I think it has helped me over the years.

    Later on I acquired a copy of Vincent Cichowicz's "Trumpet Flow Studies" (very melodic exercises) and he has a pedal tone exercise in his book. Hasselman went to Northwestern and I assume studed under Cichowicz.

    I also have some of David Balwin's Warm-Up/Warm-Down exercises in which he uses the pedal tones as well.

    But you gentlemen are correct.......there is not much reference made to using the pedal tones in practice routines.

    Manny, I see Carl Fischer in New Jersey (now) is again offering a reprint of Mendez's book "Prelude to Brass Playing" at about $12.00. It is supposed to have some additional material not included in the original from the '60's. I think this book should be mandatory reading for every beginning student of trumpet, trombone and french horn. It has a wealth of information for the beginner especially, but also a good review for more advanced students as well.
     

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