Warming Down?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Agalego93, Apr 30, 2011.

  1. Agalego93

    Agalego93 New Friend

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    Ok so I know that people buzz their lips to somewhat recover from slightly spent chops but are there other ways of "quick recovery" that others can use?
     
  2. Al Innella

    Al Innella Forte User

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    If I'm on stage and my chops start to feel tired , I'll open my mouth wide to stretch my lips ,then flap them. This only takes a few seconds. If I'm home I'll do the same things,then rest.
     
  3. tpsiebs

    tpsiebs Piano User

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    Warming down and quick recovery are really two different things.

    As I perceive it, warming down is the antithesis to warming up. If the warmup is a routine that enables you to access the total range of the horn, then the warm down would be a similar procedure that is done at the end of a session. Once you get a dent in your lip, you are essentially done and many times low Clarke studies, low long tones or even pedal tones are used to minimize these effects. Just an aside, I never, ever use pedal tones as the very last thing I do in my warm down: after allowing the lips to buzz slow and loose for a while, I make sure that my lips "remember" their "normal playing range"

    Quick recovery like stretching and lip flapping are very effective when they become fatigued in a performance or extended practice situation.

    I guess the development of endurance will enable the player to play longer before any ill effects are noticed by the player or in the sound.
     
  4. Solar Bell

    Solar Bell Moderator Staff Member

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    I have never seen any professional players warm down after a gig.

    The horn goes in the case and we go wherever we're gong.
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Warming down would involve methods to preserve muscle that has just been stressed. I find a slow message helps. I am also a fan of sucking on an ice cube to keep swelling down when you know you have had to play more of a demanding performance that is typical. I find the ice helps me make it into the next set, and serves as a reminder to back of and relax more on my return.
     
  6. laurie

    laurie Pianissimo User

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    Warm down...........Finish gig,pack up equipment,chat with audience members,drink a cold beer with band mates,go home.
    Laurie
     
  7. stumac

    stumac Fortissimo User

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    +1, why keep playing especially after a hard gig?

    Regards, Stuart.
     
  8. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    Oh, SB, they certainly do! With a cold pint of beer down the throat ROFL (I am obviously not speaking about mouthpieces there...)
     
  9. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    I respect what Solar Bell is saying, in that I think some people can get carried away with long, drawn-out warm ups and warm downs.


    However, I agree with gomanady's statement that there is a benefit to a limited warm up and warm down. There are known physiological benefits to these actions.
    • Warming up increases the temperature of muscles, dilates blood vessles, and increases nerve impulse condition.
    • Warming down increases blood flow to help with removal of waster products (which can reduce muscle stiffness). Another benefit is to help muscle fibers reallign and assume their resting function and normal state.
     
  10. Al Innella

    Al Innella Forte User

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    Warming up has nothing to do with warming down. A warm up helps besides our lips,our breathing, ears,fingers,and our brains. A warm down does none of these things in reverse. When we finish playing,be it performing or practicing, the best thing for our chops is to take the horn off our face,not to continue playing.

    Besides I don't know of any venues where the staff wants musicians hanging around playing long tones etc. after the gig is over,just pack up and leave.
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2011

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