Warming up with a Decibel Meter

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by SmoothOperator, Nov 2, 2011.

  1. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    Would there be any advantage to warming up with a decibel meter? I think it would be something like using a tuner, but also I find that playing louder than I normally play negatively effects my tone and range, so maybe that would also help in the absence of a good conductor mind you.
     
  2. stumac

    stumac Fortissimo User

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    An interesting thought, I have used one to compare sound level with effort playing different horns and mouthpieces, the results were pretty inconclusive.

    Playing in your practice room can be vastly different than in a band in terms of acoustics and feedback to your ears.

    As an aside I took mine to band one night and the level peaked at 115 db, our workplace safety regulations call for hearing protection to be worn when the sound level exceeds 90 db, keep in mind 3 db increase in meter reading = double the level.

    Loss of tone and range with increase in volume would suggest lacking chop strength to me.

    Regards, Stuart.
     
  3. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    That is something to keep in mind. I was looking around to see what was available. I don't think anything that says +-2db will cut it then. BTW, I don't really care if I have "weak chops", if I can get a good tone at a decent level. ;-)
     
  4. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    As business agent for the musician's union I got to speak with a L&I agent on that subject in the 80's. At that point, they would come and measure only if there was a complaint. Being a trumpet player, I got to sit in the back of the orchestra, so had no complaints myself. The principal bassoon sat in front of the trumpets and went deaf. I encouraged my students to use 80 db as their mezzo forte, however.
     
  5. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    Oh I get it decibel as in decibel limits:huh:. No no I mean as a tool to measure how loud you are playing so that you don't overblow.
     
  6. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    The devices we use for measuring if we are over-blowing or not are called ears and eyes. Listen and watch the conductor.
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The only thing that we need for warming up is good ears. Good playing is the result of the note that we initially play coming back to our ears, being processed by the brain which gives instructions to the body about what to adjust. Getting the eyes involved on anything but reading music and looking at the conductor is only distracting and potentially dangerous.
     
  8. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    I love technology but have got to say I agree with the above comments. That meter sounds like more of a distraction that a help. I also imagine wher you aim your trumpet in relation to the meter has an effect.... too much infomation.
    I took golf lessons at Golf-tec a few years back. They hook sensors on you and then they compare the readings to those of pros ... I got worse and worse and worse. It would seem logical though.. I mean there you have it definitely emperical data... something to quantively measure improvement ... but did it mess with my head. After a year and much money I acknowledge that Golf Tec wasn't for me.
     
  9. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    A decibel meter is a must for a mixing sound engineer ..... If you try and mix your recordings at decibel levels that are either too high or too low you are fighting the recording (an average of 85 dB is just about right). Also, letting the decibels get much over that can cause hearing damage over time. And maybe saving a few ears along the way at rock concerts that are WAY TOO LOUD (Hot Tuna in the 80's ...:evil: ... my ears were ringing for a week).

    They're cheap. I just can't think of a trumpet related reason to have one.:dontknow:


    Turtle
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2011
  10. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    N+1 also applies to gadgets! :D I have a "point-n-measure" laser tape measure. It's pretty worthless, but the dog likes to chase the dot! ROFLROFL
     

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