Ways to build endurance

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Mamboman, Jan 8, 2012.

  1. Local 357

    Local 357 Banned

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    Yeah the 4-1 or 4-2 also a great mouthpiece but for general work only no scream. Each about the size of a 3C. Mine is in cornet shape so I must use the adapter to fit when not playing cornet.

    I use the 3x6 on most lead (RARE piece) and two 3x4's for some lead. On one of these I bored the vortex of the cup out and opened up to a #16 or so throat. Helps fight the small mouthpiece edge on exposed softer passages. I also have Steve's new 3x5. The others are all antiques.

    I like to stick my 4-2 in a flugel horn for church work. I do have an Al Cass flugel piece too but its a bit too deep for a lot of blowing. I believe that all truly huge flugel horn mouthpieces cause the upper register to go flat. Unacceptable on a piece like Mangione's "Feel So Good"
     
  2. Al Innella

    Al Innella Forte User

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    Hi Mamboman

    Like others have already said,slurs,long tones and practice with plenty of rests in between each one. The key is to practice a little longer each day ,start with an extra 5 minutes,when you're comfortable with that, add onother 5. There are no trick mouthpieces or exercises. When practicing don't play too loud,somewhere around a pp,p or mp level is best. Playing too loud will hurt your endurance .If you practice at a soft volume ,you will start to feel the burn in your corners. Don't forget to rest. Like graysono said "Patience", it dosen't happen over night or in a week ,but it will happen.
     
  3. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Chuck, you may need to acquire an O2 meter, the kind that clips on a finger. They cost about $70.00. I must use one and so check my O2 level frequently as I've got to differentiate the cause between COPD and diabetes. Otherwise use a pencil to pre-place breather points and work with piano accompanist for best performance.

    Yeah, its bad! I won't even walk or practice if my O2 reading is less than 90. Luckily, in the recent many months, it has been above 95. Too, I've diabetic tabs in my pocket, the glove compartment of our vehicles, and in front of me now. Too, I've a supply of pony size classic Coca Cola when I'm traveling.
     
  4. tfresh1

    tfresh1 New Friend

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    Portland, OR
    I use a timer on my computer (or iPhone) when I practice and it has done wonders. Instead of playing until I can't play anymore, then resting, then continuing to beat in my face with a hammer, I instead play for 10 minutes, then rest for 5, and continue this pattern for an hour. So in theory, I'm never tired. This routine also really helps me organize my practice time.

    For example:
    10 minutes - lip slur routine
    5 minutes - rest
    10 minutes - technical studies
    5 minutes - rest
    10 minutes - an etude
    5 minutes - rest
    10 minutes - improvising with play-along cd's

    Then I put it away for 3-4 hours, then come back fresh and have four more 10/5 minute sessions.

    People will (incorrectly) say that this is stupid because you'll never get strong enough to play for more than 10 minutes, but it's not true. Your muscles grow when you're resting (just like lifting weights). And I get plenty of extended playing time during rehearsals. I've found that it's been a perfect balance for me...when I'm NOT strictly regimented, I find myself overdoing it and getting beat up. But when I do this, I find myself getting much stronger and playing my best.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I don't know of "people" that say this. As a matter of fact, I dislike "generalizations" like that.

    I will argue that if you are intelligently practicing, you don't need the iPhone or computer timer more than once to time the exercises. Why did you choose to pull up an old thread? Your post could stand on its own and would get a lot of praise around here.

    One small thing, your muscles don't "grow" when you are resting, they heal - only if they were damaged. Intelligent practice develops fine motor skills between the face, breathing and what the brain tells the chops to do. The muscles start to work more precisely. I know that you only gave an example, but I would put the technical studies at the END. Music needs the freshest chops!

     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Dayton, Ohio
    Wow, is this a piece out of the TM Time Capsule. But let me freshen it up a bit since I made no comment in 2012:

    For me, the answer is simple... I found that phwoooo has increased my endurance more than any other method I have tried.
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    As a physician, I am humbled that a non-physician making this comment. Not only is it right on, but when I finally write my textbook on the physiology of trumpet playing, I will quote this directly. Wow!
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Intelligent practicing IS the answer and phwoooo doubled my trumpet IQ.
     
  9. tfresh1

    tfresh1 New Friend

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    Jun 23, 2008
    Portland, OR
    Sorry...I didn't look at the date of the previous post before chiming in. I didn't realize it was so old.

    I used that generalization because the last time I posted on this topic I was torn apart by many people criticizing my approach.
     

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