Wear Removal Question

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by BrassBandMajor, Jul 5, 2015.

  1. BrassBandMajor

    BrassBandMajor Fortissimo User

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    Is this wear?
    And can you remove it???
    Or is it relacquering?
    [​IMG]
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The lacquer is worn off and to fix it you need lacquer. Spot lacquering is not always sensible and depends on the type of original lacquer. On a position like this with constant hand contact, it probably makes more sense to strip, prep and relacquer the horn - far exceeding the true current value of the instrument.
     
  3. stumac

    stumac Fortissimo User

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    Yes the lacquer was worn away exposing the brass which has tarnished.

    The brass can be polished and the area relacquered but it will always show. This is pretty normal on older instruments with nitro-cellulose lacquer.

    Do not worry about it. At that price you won't get a new one unless it is a bottom end Chinese or Indian.

    Regards, Stuart.
     
  4. NFS_87

    NFS_87 Pianissimo User

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    Whenever I come across a horn with the lacquer worn that way, or even once it wears that way from playing it myself I always think of it as something that tells a story of how much the horn has been enjoyed over its life and let it be. Everyone's taste is different on that matter of "patina" but food for thought none the less.
     
  5. Dennis78

    Dennis78 Fortissimo User

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    I would say no you cannot remove ware, if anything you should be spending time contributing to ware
     
  6. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Knowing more about finishing things, particularly with lacquer, than I did years ago, I've often wondered if it would be feasible to do a spot-lacquering job on something like that. Although lacquer has fumes that are harmful, overall it's a pretty forgiving finish to apply because it becomes part of the layer of finish it's going on. Nitro lacquer is pretty easy to come by as well.

    I'm not sure it's advisable in this case, at least not by the OP, but a decent brass tech should be able to clean that up and do a touch-up on it.
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Patrick,

    there are several reasons why lacquer disappears in a big way. Most time the reason is bad prep or bad care. Very seldom "friction". IF the original lacquer is nitro based, yes they fuse. If it is epoxy base, it does not. If the original prep was marginal, more is waiting to come off to the left and right of that spot.

     
  8. Phil986

    Phil986 Forte User

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    I see an instrument that's been played. I like it. The wear doesn't bother me one bit as long as the metal underneath is good. I would barely consider it a factor if I was to evaluate the instrument for a buy. In all likelihood, it will not change its lifespan or usability and does not affect its performance.
     
  9. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    All things I already knew, but thanks. ;-)
     

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