Wedge Breathing

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by chrisryche, Jun 26, 2013.

  1. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Here is context. I use more of the wedge concept by first lifting my shoulders to help expand what the chest muscle groups perform, then JUST BEFORE blowing and after taking that breath, I immediately RELAX the shoulders. Never play with tight shoulders. I then use pwhuuu breathing to exhale which works the best for me. That exhale option opens up my embouchure more than any technique I have ever used. It relies on using the upper muscles of the face that insert in the zygomatic arch (the bone below the eye). Look at it as the muscles that lead to a curve up smile - :D. This is apposed to the traditional embouchure that is a lateral smile that creates more of the traditional buzz.:shhh: Ask anyone that has heard me play, the sound that comes out is powerful whether in the lead range or when playing pedal tones.
     
  2. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Gman,
    You stated when discussing Wedge Breathing:
    "Ask anyone that has heard me play, the sound that comes out is powerful whether in the lead range or when playing pedal tones."
    ---
    Yes, I can attest the The Gman uses this modified type of breathing and when you hear the band he plays with, it makes sense. The Eddie Brookshire band is not a mellow trip down Miles Davis Way. Nope, Eddie's band is a high energy Autobaun that will knock the mundane dust of mediocracy right out of your ears(even their slow songs have a undercurrent of sizzle.) They are a treat to watch and hear. Using the modified breathing for this high energy band works well in this environment and the Gman takes advantage of this technique.
    Hope this helps
    Dr.Mark
     
  3. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    Hey, you guys (& gals) it's "PEDAL" tones!!!! Like the pedal on an organ (don't even think about it, G). Stop peddling!
     
  4. BigSwingFace

    BigSwingFace Pianissimo User

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    I thought they were petal tones because you're supposed to play them delicately...you know...like a flower.
     
  5. BigSwingFace

    BigSwingFace Pianissimo User

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  6. PINCHUNO

    PINCHUNO Piano User

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    Bud Brisbois. Maynard. Lynn Nicholson. Bobby Shew. Roger Ingram. Scott Englebright and countless more world class lead players use the wedge breath. Not to mention thousands more regular players around the world. There's nothing strange or "unheard" of with regards to the wedge breath.
     
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  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    WOW!!! Thanks Dr.Mark!
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    An honorary Editor's kudos for you.
     
  9. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    I still maintain concepts like "wedge breathing" describe the symptoms, or side-effects of good breathing rather than the cause.
     
  10. Wondra

    Wondra Pianissimo User

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    A history clarification...Maynard gave Bobby the Science of Breath book, though it was Bud Brisbois who showed Bobby how to do it (use the breathing method). The book is in the public domain, so if you want to read it, here you go: http://www.arfalpha.com/ScienceOfBreath/ScienceOfBreath.pdf

    If you do read the book, you'll see pretty quickly that it isn't a trumpet method, so it is really helpful to work with someone who knows the breath. A few people have mentioned using it mostly for power playing. The Wedge is really a breathing method that can be applied to all playing - its a matter of degree. In fact, it shouldn't even be noticeable if someone were watching you use it (i.e. body movements and such). It is really easy to turn the wedge into a "crush the air" thing, which doesn't work. An experienced observer could give you some initial feedback to help you get on the right track.

    Like Rowak said earlier, there are some basic things that need to happen to make the system - and breathing - work. There are different ways to get that done, and the Wedge is one of them.

    I've had several lessons with Bobby, and have been around him for many years.
     

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