Well... this is... intresting...

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Mud, Jul 6, 2012.

  1. Mud

    Mud Pianissimo User

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    May 26, 2012
    Noblesville, IN
    Well, I am an incoming sophmore in high school, and this is my first year marching.
    We (the trumpet section) recruited 2 woodwinds to learn how to play trumpet due to the shortage of trumpets willing to march (we choose a very trumpetie song to march to), and I ended up teaching them how to play. Now, our section leader's parents like to go on vacation around marching time, so he is commonly gone the first and/or second week of marching. We decided, that when he is gone, this other guy was to be "fake section leader" until our actual section leader gets back, because he's the oldest trumpet (besides our section leader), and hes marched the longest etc.
    We come back, its our first week of marching. THe first day, the staff member in charge of the trumpet section pulls me aside, and tells me that until our section leader gets back, I am to be section leader. Remember this is my first year marching.
    Also, no one tells the other guy, that was supposed to be section leader, although I think the staff member did, so he was acting like section leader, and so was I, so I kind of thought that we were "sharing" the title section leader (although he was never present at the section leader meetings. Of course, stupid me, this never crosses my mind, being so busy trying to figure out how to read the drill and whatnot).

    So, to make myself clear, I am not complaining, boasting, showing off, freaking out, I am simply sharing this intresting conundrum. It feels rather backwards, being taught how to march, then having to turn around and correct someone who's been marching for several years. It's intresting, because I'm still learning all the Do's and Don't s in what to/not to eat before basics block in 90 degree weather (thats farenheit, my fellow non-american trumpet players), and having to sit out, watching your section, because you almost pass out for eating a footlong in under 5 minutes, and then not drinking enough water ( I honestly feel bad about that, I am section leader, I shouldn't be sitting out). So it's like instead of telling people what to do in marching, you suggest with a hint of possible doubt, so you make sure they know that you are not being ignorant of their well-advanced knowledge in the ways of marching, even though your director is new this year, and changed EVERYTHING in marching, including how you stand. Of course, the staff member is there, and is helping out, I am more of a "newbie with benefits" (I sometimes like to think of it).

    Yes, this is a very interesting start to my marching career indeed....
     
  2. mgcoleman

    mgcoleman Mezzo Forte User

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    Iowa
    2 nuggets I would share with you:
    1) Leadership cannot be shared (make sure everyone knows YOU are in charge by your actions and deeds - being attentive, stay informed, be an engaged and active learner, be helpful, and be publicly accountable both up and down for the results)
    2) A leader who believes they know it all, who can't learn, who won't learn, and/or is intolerant of well-intentioned mistakes during the learning process is not a leader (stop worrying about being a newbie, remember everyone can make mistakes and just keep motivating your section to be their best).

    You are learning valuable lessons. Keep at it, work hard and have fun!
     
  3. D.C. Al fine

    D.C. Al fine Banned

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    May 8, 2012
    USA
    Okay, let me just offer this little bit of advice.

    Lead by example, and dont give crap to people or you will get crap in return. Be a fun, give positive remarks, and say good job a lot. Even if they did not do a great job, say it.
     
  4. patkins

    patkins Forte User

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    Take the leadership position humbly and you will make a great leader. Talk with the other guy, so there is no miscommunication. Clarify your position inn a nonthreatening way. Be a friend as much as possible.
     
  5. Mud

    Mud Pianissimo User

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    May 26, 2012
    Noblesville, IN
    That is my goal. I don't want to be a poopy-pants section leader. Every time my new trumpet players tell me about their experiences in practicing that day, how they figured out how to do something, what they learned, I can't stop grinning. They are so enthusiastic, and they are doing great! I try my best to praise them for trying, and when they don't succeed, applaud their determination, and try to give them as many tips as I can. When I first started trumpet, I didn't necessarily have someone to really help me out with this stuff. I went through 4 years without knowing most of the basic fundamentals, and then my freshman year, I had to quickly catch up. I don't want these converted woodwinds to have to go through what I did; I don't want them to have to learn everything the hard way. Of course, I won't baby them, but I will not leave them without an answer.
    As for the others, some are better than me, some are worse. I try not to interfere much with those who know what they are doing-- I try not to tell them to do what they already know. They know I am section leader, and they respect that, but they are going to be less enthusiastic in doing what I ask-- its kinda like having to take orders from your little sibling... a little humbling. I try to be respectful, and aware of what their capabilites are. I'm not afraid of asking for help on certain things. As for those that not as good as me, most are actually the same grade as me, and I try to be really friendly and helpful, but I don't like to look down on people.

    I hate looking down on people. I've always kind of wanted to be section leader, and so luckily, I have thought about how I would treat people.
    I try to talk to people on their level. I try to make people as comfortable as possible when they talk to me, and I know what its like to ask people younger than me for help (gotta cope with that trumpet ego), so I try to be humble. I am always available when people want to talk to me, and I just want our section to come to its fullest potential, and I will do all in my power to do so, even if it means going out of my way to help out someone, or even learn new things just so if people have questions in that particular area, I can give them my 2 cents.

    I refuse to be the section leader that you're always embarassed to ask them questions.
     
  6. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    I recall it was Dave Hughes on here -- that gave me some tips for marching (heel down first, and then roll to the toe -- that makes marching easier, and less "bumpy") --- I still can't believe woodwind players could be ready to play trumpet in a few short months (all the best on that -- but I don't want to discourage them or you --it just takes time for the trumpet).

    My community band director gave me this tip (since I marched ((as a trumpet player on this trumpet playing site) -- I march with the trombone, which is NEW for me, and only been playing it 6 months now)) --anyways his tip was. LEARN how to march first -- then you can easily match up playing to the march.

    I mean easy for that guy to say -- he is a drummer in the parades!!!! ROFL ROFL ROFL
    of course -- he must have noticed that if WE STOP in the parade and continue to play in place --- MY FEET STOP ALSO, while everyone else marches in place.
    I mean come on, it's a community band, with us old people -- aren't we allowed to Slack a bit???? and the trombone -- for me -- to get big sound, takes a lot of air --- cant' I grasp for breath everynow and then????

    yes -- learn to march first --- whatever that means!!!!!!!!! ROFL ROFL ROFL
     
  7. Mud

    Mud Pianissimo User

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    May 26, 2012
    Noblesville, IN
    haha nice Kingtrumpet. they've actually marched before, so actually at some times, they were helping me learn how to march. so it was like a trade off. you scratch my back, ill scratch yours. :p
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Dayton, Ohio
    Interesting situation... In medicine, we have the saying, see one... do one... teach one... this works in the world of music as well, but in the world of music if you screw up, likely you won't get sued.
     
  9. Mud

    Mud Pianissimo User

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    May 26, 2012
    Noblesville, IN
    hahaha! or else a LOT of musicians would be oweing money......
     
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Sometimes the see one... do one... teach one... will have value in other areas of performance (not just for instance marching band). For instance a marching band technique that you learn (coordinating hand or step movement) may be also applied on stage when you play with a rock band in the horn section. I did this a lot working my way through college in funk bands. I used some of the skills from marching band to choreograph movements into the horns with the funk band.

    Come to think of it in medicine, I put a lot of time into placing iv's into prematurely born infants during my Neonatology Intensive Care Rotations (too many months to mention), but knew I would never want to admit and care for another premie again once I finished residency. Went into private practice and found out about a skill that applied the same technique of inserting 33 gauge (very small) catheters into very small veins... this time spider veins (tiny veins that break on people's legs as they age). I could totally eliminate the veins with the same skill I learned on neonates, but this time with very lovely long legged women that came in by the score to have me work on the legs. Charged $180 a pop, and got the chance to work up close with babes again! Man do I love my day gig.
     

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