Wet or dry lips... does it matter?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by _TrumpeT_, Jun 19, 2006.

  1. Conntribution

    Conntribution Fortissimo User

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    Funny thing, this... When I was young and starting out, for the first 5 years, in fact. I played with a "wet" (saliva moistened embouchure).
    Howbeit, as I aged, and (according to myself) improved I played dry. I no longer had to position the mouthpiece for highs and lows as previously. I discovered I could keep the mouthpiece in one position for all playing. And so it remains.
     
  2. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    You know, the one thing that always has me at a disadvantage is when playing an outside venue in the heat of the summer. The sweat pouring from my face onto my lips just really makes it hard for me to center my embouchure. My mustache helps to delay the inevitable, but I really do not like playing wet from sweat.
     
  3. drmctchr

    drmctchr Pianissimo User

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    keigoh ... I like your approach ... and I second gmonady's suggestion. Here is my own similar example. When I entered graduate school I discovered the area in the library for professional journals. (I had not used the library much as an undergraduate since textbooks seemed to be all that were needed ... but at the time the library was a good place to meet chicks). In those days there were no electronic search engines ... just look and read and order materials by mail from other libraries. So I wandered around in this new section ... pulling odd categories off the shelves to scan through and having an epiphany of excitement as I discovered new things to ask questions about. For example I then designed an experiment to examine the relationship of extrasensory perception to empathy. I like the idea that much is learned by "surprise" when a person is exposed to strange new things. I, like you, have been fascinated by many of the old TM threads and have "wasted" my time here going hither and yon (that was rap in my day) following odd links and finding gems lost in the archives. FUN !!! Sometimes historical. Sometimes hysterical. Always heuristic(al).
     
  4. Randall Nelson

    Randall Nelson Mezzo Piano User

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    "Wet or dry lips... does it matter?"

    Doesn't....not here at least right now. As of last weekend I entered one of those phases in combacking where nothing seems to matter. Basically it's not gravity that keeps me me here on the planet...I suck.

    Times like this that it's my interest in the different vintage horns that keeps me going... maybe a N+1 would do wonders....
    Better than that might be some sunscreen on the chops when I ride the bike on sunny days and then try to play. Yes...100% male...and still dumb after all these years :oops:
     
  5. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    While it seems wet is more prevalent, there are a few of us dry chop guys around. My embrasure is such that the chops seem to grip the mouthpiece. When wet, the mouthpiece slips out of place. Almost wish I could play with wet chops- just not what God gave me.
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I prefer grip to slip any day. I am with you on this (as well as your excellent selection of Trumpets and especially Flugelhorns (with mouthpiece choice))... as God had intended it.
     
  7. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Grip !!! Yes, I concur you've more grip when dry but I'd just as likely believe you also favor a mpc rim that is flatter and a mpc cup with a bit of bite also. I wouldn't say I play wet, just moist and favor a rim with a curved crown and less bite in the cup as is not to say I can't play otherwise and often do. It's just a most comfort thing. Some factors that comes into play with this are barometric pressure, humidity, and temperature. When I first learned to play, air conditioning was non-existent, most venues were heated by coal furnaces and I was over a 1,000 feet above sea level, and now I'm less than 500 feet above sea level with just window AC units and propane space heat as in winter we'll put a container of water on to raise the humidity. Yeah, stand within 6 feet of a row of 100w reflector footlights, under a bank of 500w stage lights and a few Kliegs and a spotlight and your hair begins to glisten with moisture and you begin to feel the sweat trickle down the middle of your back. My point is you make do and adapt to whatever the circumstances are when you are playing and that comes down to even the quality of instrument you are playing.
     
  8. drmctchr

    drmctchr Pianissimo User

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    Randall ... Last week for a while I was feeling kind of like you are describing (a little discouraged ?). The search for a perfect personal flugelhorn seemed pretty meaningless. Rather (thought I), "Just go back to Montana with my old Besson and watch the grass grow." But there is an interesting factor in the workings of the human brain. It's like the weather ... wait a while and it will change. The minds of humans are much like the weather ... only on much faster turn-arounds. Instead of long waits for winter and summer (or daytime and night-time), humans have faster alternating variations of optimism and pessimism. There is a mental trick I used to teach that sometimes helped make that transition faster. It was to blast away (using TNT) the mind-stuff which create the discouragement/pessimism (or fear or anger or worry). TNT represents (as follows):

    T for "It's TRUE that I am in a funk". [Accept the real situation].
    .....rather than, "It shouldn't be true that this is happening. This real-life history should NOT be happening."

    N for "It's NATURAL/NORMAL that this happens". [Don't make it even worse].
    ......rather than, "This is really strange, unusual, odd, weird, terrible, ... and requires a dramatic response".

    T for " This funk is TEMPORARY". [Remember that things change].
    .....rather than, "Oh crap, this will never change. I'm stuck with this forever".

    Well, my optimism returned as I gave less credence to the "Oh crap" of life. I hope that by now you are again concerned about wet or dry lips ... or about how to get a great tone ... or how to get one note (N +1) higher ... or about whether to buy "just one more horn". (grin)

    Best wishes,
    drmctchr

    PS: BTW, TNT also works well for road rage when someone cuts you off, or when you drop a brand new horn and dent it, or when you find raccoons living in your attic.
     
  9. Randall Nelson

    Randall Nelson Mezzo Piano User

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    This is quite good...I used to say I worked for ITT...meaning It Takes Time. But I like your description better.

    Today's practice was bomber and back to normal...no doubt the use of lots of Burt's Bee's to assuage angry chapped lips plus getting rehydrated after riding hard last week. Didn't hurt either that I hauled out the 1930 King Silvertone Artist Bore with Dan Oberloh's silky valves...:D Life is Good...got my sense of humor back...again.
    Thanks
     

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