What are some good endurance exercises?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by 1stTrumpet, Jan 7, 2010.

  1. Bach Kid

    Bach Kid New Friend

    6
    1
    Dec 31, 2009
    I am curious how many people here can buz scales or tunes without the mouthpiece?
    I don't use pressure and I can play a long time but my buzz tone seems t be a low C. When I play a note and remove the trumpet, low C comes out every time.
     
  2. Keith Fiala

    Keith Fiala Pianissimo User

    239
    1
    Feb 21, 2007
    Austin, Texas
    "Tired" is not a taught habit, it's a result. To build up strength, you have to "use" those muscles and then let them rest.
     
  3. tipo mastr

    tipo mastr New Friend

    46
    1
    Jun 6, 2009
    i know where you're coming from. but everybody knows that muscle strength isnt all trumpet playing is about. if the tongue/lips/airflow/whatever have to work with collapsing facial muscles all the time, they're gonna learn a way to play when the facial muscles are tired. it's like playing a reed instrument...when the ligature comes loose, you retighten it and move on. of course you dont have that luxury with muscles, so the only way to "retighten" your "ligature" is to rest.

    btw, i dont mean badly, i just feel like debating right now =P
     
  4. Keith Fiala

    Keith Fiala Pianissimo User

    239
    1
    Feb 21, 2007
    Austin, Texas
    Tipo,

    No sweat... I understand. You say "tomaeto" and I say "tomahto". We're essentially saying the same thing from different angles. Tired muscles need rest - hands down.

    K
     
  5. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

    3,724
    758
    Nov 5, 2003
    Rochester, MN
    Its not easy, that's for sure. Nick D. just makes it look easy.
    However, I think he is correct in what he teaches in his videos.
    If you can train yourself to do those minimal to no pressure scales, then you will end up with very efficient chops, use very little pressure, and really lengthen the amount of time you can play without "losing your lip".

    BTW, I've heard very similar exercise techniques from several other really fine players, I just happen to think Nick D. does a very good job of explaining things.

    I have just started in the last month or two to spend more time trying what he suggests and am seeing steady improvement,
    so, I am eager for his new practice guide to be completed:
    http://www.nickdrozdoff.com/


    Greg
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2010
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,963
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Muscle strength may not be everything, but it sure is the first thing that a weak player notices!

    Correcting that needs a correct view of the present situation, a strategy to improve what is weak (breathing, flexibility, strength, all of the above) then the patience to do the right thing.

    When the player slows down, they give themselves an opportunity to catch up and balance their skills. Habits require thousands of repetitions. We can squeeze more repetitions in when we practice with lower impact, resting often.
     
  7. tipo mastr

    tipo mastr New Friend

    46
    1
    Jun 6, 2009
    amen.
     
  8. guyclark

    guyclark Piano User

    344
    7
    Feb 28, 2008
    Los Gatos, CA
    Yes, everybody listen to Rowuk! He's absolutely right. Endurance comes from playing and playing and playing.

    It helps to get the mouthpiece off of your face frequently, if possible. There's nothing that wears me out more than a page or two of solid playing (poor orchestration, if you asked me.) Back in the Chicago area, my brass quintet used to play three Xmas eve services for a local church. The leader of our group was our trombonist, and he LOVED to program certain medleys of carols that didn't give me or my wife a chance to get the horns off of our faces. The first year we did this, I ran out of steam before the end of the gig! After that, I made sure that I was really in shape before Xmas, and I never had an empty gas tank (for that gig) again!

    I also recommend that one use the largest possible mouthpiece. With a big diameter, more of your lip is vibrating, and you don't have to work so hard to play loud, and at the same time, as long as the cup depth is proportional to the diameter, you'll automatically get a bigger, fatter tone. Plus, should your lip swell up anyway, it's got more room to swell before it doesn't have room to vibrate.

    Rowuk's words are gospel to me on this subject!

    Guy Clark
    www.southbaybrass.com
    www.siliconvalleybrassband.com
     
  9. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    60
    12,460
    7,037
    Mar 23, 2006
    Parts Unknown
    Let us not forget that there are two kinds of endurance. One involves playing many relatively short passages for a long time; the other involves playing something that keeps the horn on the face for a considerable amount of time, like playing a Phillip Glass piece. Practicing for long periods with breaks is a great way to go, but sometimes pulling out the 'ol hymnbook and playing all seven verses back to back can be great training as well.

    Have fun!
     
  10. guyclark

    guyclark Piano User

    344
    7
    Feb 28, 2008
    Los Gatos, CA
    Hi, Bro!

    I'd say start out with the many short pieces with short breaks to start with, and as strength develops, reduce the amount of rest time. One DOESN'T want to hurt ones self, or develop bad habits such as pressing.

    Endurance is truly something that develops over a long period of time, maybe years! Don't rush it, DON'T PRESS!!! Don't play so loud, if you don't have to. Learn where you can safely leave out notes. Breathe well to fully oxygenate your body. Try to be in shape in the rest of your body besides your lips!!! Did I mention DON'T PRESS!!?

    If necessary, develop a good rapport with your section mates, and maybe you can trade off on sections if that helps. I married one of mine! ;-) ( you don't need THAT good a rapport, however!)

    Hope some of these ideas help!

    Guy Clark
    www.southbaybrass.com
    www.siliconvalleybrassband.com
     

Share This Page