What are the chords I need to play in the key of D major.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by tjer52, Dec 20, 2012.

  1. tjer52

    tjer52 New Friend

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    Nov 24, 2009
    I will be improvising to a song in D major "I surrender all" What chords do I need to play and be safe. The circle fifth suggested D G A.
    Also, can I use the D F# A chords also.

    Thanks.
     
  2. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    My Band in A Box had these as the changes...

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2012
  3. amzi

    amzi Forte User

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    It somewhat depends on the arrangement being used but the version we use is just 3 chords I-IV-V (D-G-A in your case). Don't know where an F# would fit in, but I've seen stranger things in hymn arrangements.
     
  4. tjer52

    tjer52 New Friend

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    Thanks Amzi, I have no clue on this but I'll get it some day. Can I also throw a B (VI) in there once in a while. I figure since D is the tonic, I can go 3 semitone from D and still be safe.
     
  5. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Hey, if you throw in the "wrong" note, it's jazz! I listened to sooooo much jazz as a kid, I throw in the "wrong" notes regularly (I hear it in my head). Piano player digs it, sax player hates it because it's "wrong" to play jazz in church and it's not in the chord structure! He's very legalistic musically speaking. It really does depend on the arrangement so get with your leader and work it out.
     
  6. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    I didn't think we could play chords on trumpet, unless yo uare talking about multiphonics. Personally, I think it much more important to know the MELODY well enough to play it by ear, and then in a major key play thirds, 4th and 5ths above or below, depending on where in the scale the melody line is. For instance, if the melody has a note which is on the dominant (A in key of D), then you can play an F# (the 3rd), or a D, and be pretty safe. If the melody note is an F#, an A or a D is safe. You can often parallel the melody a major interval away and sound OK. If you are listening you should be able to tell if it is working.

    Get the hymnal and jump around between soprano and alto parts.
     
  7. tjer52

    tjer52 New Friend

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    Nov 24, 2009
    Thanks Tobi, but unfortunately, the leader doesn't know music theory. He plays the keyboard and couldn't tell you what key he's playing in. He can only play by ear. The saxophonist is ok, very loud and plays every song from the begining to the end. Anyway, a little bit of jazz wont hurt the church.
     
  8. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Amen Brotha! Can I get a witneeeesssssssss!! :D
     
  9. tjer52

    tjer52 New Friend

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    Nov 24, 2009
    Thanks, Veery, yes I know the melody to the song. I can play the solo part but this time, the keyboard guy will be playing the solo and both me and the saxophonist guy will do the melody improvisation. One at a time, me (trumpet) first and the saxophonist. Scary thought.....
     
  10. Satchmo Brecker

    Satchmo Brecker Piano User

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    How funny. A little less than 100 years ago you'd probably have been thrown out for such words.
     

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