What are the chords I need to play in the key of D major.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by tjer52, Dec 20, 2012.

  1. amzi

    amzi Forte User

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    When I was learning to improvise (and there was no mention of chord progressions I was taught to do it by ear alone) my mentor told me if you hit a "clinker" don't apologize for it. Hang on to it, fold, spindle and mutilate it until you make it sound right--then move on. As has Tobylou8 has already said--if it doesn't have "wrong" notes it ain't jazz.
     
  2. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    I don't know what's going on here, but that lead sheet that's posted is in the key of A major, not D, the key signature notwithstanding.
    On the chance that the OP also is looking at a similar lead sheet - that is that he is actually in A and not D - my response refers to the key of A major.
    OP - What are the last two bars of your lead sheet?

    tjer52, those chord changes are basically diatonic to the key of Amajor, with no temporary modulations. That means that you can play your entire solo with the A scale. It will get monotonous if you just think of it that way, though, so try to play off of the various chords thinking of the scales corresponding to the roots of the chords. In other words, if you see a B minor chord, emphasise the colour of the B minor scale but you are still only using the notes that belong in the A major scale.

    I happen to disagree with a blanket statement that there are no wrong notes in jazz because it can give novices the wrong impression. There are no wrong notes for those who know how to use those notes. Those who don't know - they can suck and make you sound like a rank beginner.

    Your comment about playing B scale on the B chord. I hope you are using short-cut wording here. That is not a B (maj) chord and you would not play a B major scale with it. It's a B minor chord and you're going to play a B minor-type scale. (Actually, that chord is the iimin chord of A Major and the actual scale is a Dorian mode.)

    To add colour, when you are playing on the different chords, you can also play arpeggiated figures, as well as scale-wise ideas. Again, as far as the chords go, they are based on thirds which stay in the diatonic key of A major, the parent key. So if you see B minor, you don't really have to go through any mental gyrations thinking, "what's a B minor chord?", you just think of stacking thirds from B, in A major, i.e. B-D-F#.

    I've given you a lot of context, but it's not really not that complex. Work from the outside in. First work with just the A major scale. Then work with the A Major scale but as a mode of whatever chord you are given. Listen to the colours of the melody notes you're choosing over the chords.

    (If you want to develop more, either now or in the future, learn how to embellish the melody and the scale notes with approach notes, turns, enclosures and other conventional embellishments that add out-of-scale notes which add interest but which are handled in such a way that make sense.)

     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2012
  3. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    the sheet I posted was in my Band In A Box... you can change it to whatever key you want it to be in.
    I don't know the song, just saw the title and looked to see if it was in my pile.

    I updated my earlier post to show the correct parts for playing in the key of C.
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2012
  4. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    No - Please leave it for the time being. We can use it as a reference and as a comparison to what the OP may or may not have. Thanks for posting.
     
  5. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    Jiarby - I think your BIAB has key signaturitis. The one in A needs 3 sharps and the one in D needs 2. (The sheets I 've seen have it in D with the 2 sharps.)

    kehaulani - you actually scrutinized the lead sheet! What collosal nerve. And then, on top of that, you had the temerity to be oh, so , uh, right. What, never a thought as to how that makes the rest of us look?
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2012
  6. tjer52

    tjer52 New Friend

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    Without a doubt. Obla di, Obla da .....
     
  7. tjer52

    tjer52 New Friend

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    Kehaulani, the last 2 bar are E (ii) D (root).

    Thanks.
     
  8. BinaryHulledIon

    BinaryHulledIon Piano User

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    I thought for a moment that it was just starting on the major fifth chord, but now I see that it seems to end on one as well... how odd.
     
  9. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    E to D? You mean e minor to D Maj? Are you sure? That's a funny cadence for such a conservatively harmonised tune to end on. What's the source of your lead sheet?
    Anyway, giving you the information to use is just a matter of changing all the "A"s in my post above to "D"s and the "B min" to "e minor". I can look at it tomorrow. At any rate, everything I wrote applies except that instead of playing diatonically using the scale of "A" Maj, you use "D" Maj.
     
  10. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    that's what you get when you just download something! who knows what it really is!
     

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