What are you "thinking" when you transpose.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by jdostie, Feb 8, 2011.

  1. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    What was wrong with the drums? Why did I switch???:dontknow:

    Turtle
     
  2. jdostie

    jdostie Piano User

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    Right, I understand that, but I guess to rephrase my question, what do you "call that ote in your mind" if anything, are you thinking, oh, that's a b, so up one position is a c, but I have to add two sharps, so it's c#, or are are you still thinking b, but played 12, or concert b played 12, or not calling it anything in our mind, it's just in that position on the staff after I move it and add two sharps, which position wit a sharp is 12.

    I get the blurred notes thug, bifocals don't help, and even special duty reading glasses seem to aid only to a point as the eye doctor can't seem to get the focal distance quite right for a music stand a trumpet and + a little away from the eyes. Or maybe I have to bring a music stand and trumpet in to his office... Funny thing is, even though I can't always make it out entirely, looking at the page still helps. I can't make out the number of legerdemain lines, but relative position to whatever I Amy playing clues me in I guess.
     
  3. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    seriously, I've worked it out for now, in my mind, like this:

    1. Reading music is always in Bb (for now, that's the trumpet I have).

    2. Playing by ear without any written music around (to CDs, the radio, movie soundtracks and jamming with friends.) ... I think in C. The fingerings are all different but I try not to mix the two approaches.

    3. Transposing is avoided at all costs (for now, when I can get away with it) ... or left to somebody else to do.:-)

    Turtle
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2011
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I really only see and think the note printed on the page when I transpose. So when I see a D, I recognize it as a D and know I have to play the line above it. When I am playing the line above, I do not think it is an E, I just play it with 1,2 valves down because the line above D is 1,2 valve fingering. I don't think my brain ever registered the note I just played as an E. Does this make sense? When transposing, I read the note in front of me and organize my fingers to the half step above, instinctively, without thinking of the note I am playing.

    The real thought process is needed when I see an E on the page in the key of C and I have programmed my brain to remember I must hit valve 2 (F#) instead of valve 1 (F) as I pre-set my perspective to add 2 sharps to the original key. For the key of concert C, I only have to remember 2 "exceptions": Read an E as valve 2, read a B as valve 1,2.

    It's very similar to how I best spoke a foreign language. Rather than analyzing and translating the phrase: Do you understand? I just spoke Siest du? based on experienced recognition which to me meant do you understand rather that the literal translation "Do you see".

    Siest du?
     
  5. jdostie

    jdostie Piano User

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    Got it.
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I think only about the music.

    Transposition is learned in the practice room until it is solid. I use different clefs to sightread, not intervals or other fingerings. My first transposition was Eb because my girlfriend played sax and next to the trumpet I played baritone bass clef and tuba. Those bass clef fingerings for Bb instruments are Eb transposition.

    The next transposition was C because I wanted to play in the orchestra and in church. 700 hymns were my secret to success 1 step up.
     
  7. Jfrancis

    Jfrancis Pianissimo User

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    I'm thinking, "I hate transposing" that out of the way. I play a lot of it by ear. Find the key - check thle line, find the accidentals and ear it. That's why we've practiced scales til we're blue in the face.

    Rosta Ruck
     
  8. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    +1
     
  9. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Because you wanted to be a musician?!:lol::lol:
     
  10. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Mnemonic for the order of flats: "Bears, Elephants And Dogs Go Creeping Forward." Sharps: "Fair Cinderella Goes Down And Eats Bugs."
    (Thank you, Mr. Cole!)
     

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