What are your thoughts on Light-Heavy trumpets?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Gxman, Dec 9, 2014.

  1. Gxman

    Gxman Piano User

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    Hello,

    Been a busy year for me practicing trumpet with an extraordinary teacher to guide me. In the last 9 Months my playing has completely changed/transformed. Now that I am down to 9 months playing, things are getting harder, Upper G's and A's are needed and I can't seem to break from G to the A... its like that jump is more than say F-G. I will get there eventually.

    Anyways, I had a thought on the way home.

    I was contemplating a Prana 3 vs a Prana 7 Monette horn. The aspect I contemplated was that the Prana 7 is the heaviest trumpet they make before sheet bracing is needed.

    To my understanding, a trumpet gets heavier when the brass is thicker?

    If that is the case, how does that actually effect the tonal quality of the instrument?

    Logically I would assume that a lighter trumpet vibrates more (more flimsy), while the more dense (thicker), heavier trumpet would not vibrate as much....

    How would that translate into tonal quality though? On one hand it could be assumed the thicker one would sound more 'dead' while the lighter (thinner) one would be more lively....

    Thoughts?
     
  2. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    The thickness of the metal is one of the aspects that affects how a trumpet responds. As an example we can look at the Bach models. The ML bore is made from what could be considered heavy tubing, whereas the L bore is made from regular thickness tubing. The outside diameter of the tubing of both models is the same, only the inside diameter is different.

    Does your teacher have an opinion for you on trumpet weight?
     
  3. Gxman

    Gxman Piano User

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    No he doesn't. His focus is to make me a good player, then hardware I choose won't matter. It was just a thought I had thinking about the Prana 3 and 7, 1 being heavier than the other. Obviously the same rule would apply to all horns, so I was curious how it would work.
     
  4. Dean_0

    Dean_0 Piano User

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  5. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    Your reasoning "Obviously......." is not necessarily correct, sorry.
     
  6. Gxman

    Gxman Piano User

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    I meant obviously in context of my thoughts about how a thicker trumpet would sound compare to a thinner one rather than "This is how a Monette Prana 3 and 7 works". Sorry for confusion.

    I just mentioned those 2 horns as that was the horn in mind when I thought about "How does a thicker/thinner trumpet translate into tone" (because Prana 7 is thicker than Prana 3) and the only word I could think of is "dead" (may be the wrong word, hence I am asking here) as it does not vibrate as much. That could be entirely wrong, or perhaps correct in extreme cases (like a concrete tube that doesn't vibrate at all). So maybe within the limits/parameters of a trumpets thickness may not mean more dead sounding (unless it was extremely thick when that would happen), and thus I wanted thoughts regarding thin vs thick horn, how does that work/translate into tone?
     
  7. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    There are many factors that determine how a horn plays. One cannot take a detail from one horn and apply its affects on another. That is what makes trumpet design magical!
     
  8. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    I tend to gravitate toward the mid ground on trumpet and mouthpiece specs. The specialized equipment is best left to specialists.
     
  9. gordonfurr1

    gordonfurr1 Forte User

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    Heaviness does not exactly translate to absorbtive.
    A concrete mass would be much more energy absorbtive than brass...I would expect.
    A high-mass trumpet (well designed) is intended to GET more sonic energy out the bell.
    A high-mass trumpet that works well (I hear) is a Harrelson with the SWE TECHNOLOGY.
    Google Harrelson trumpets, he has a good video there. He also works hard to strengthen the piping where "anti-nodes" tend to occur to help minimize energy loss through vibration. How do they sound? Maybe some here familiar with them can report on firsthand experience.
    A lighter trumpet that works well (I hear) is a Buescher 400 Lightweight. Ask Tom about his.
     
  10. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Seems like what we need is the exact same trumpet made of a different thickness metal to really see the effect. Of course, WHERE the thickness differs also likely makes a difference too. For instance, seems like I remember hearing lightweight bells tend to make horns more responsive. Not sure what is the effect of a lightweight leadpipe.
     

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