What are your thoughts on the benefits, if any, of freediving concerning trumpet

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by coolerdave, Jun 8, 2014.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Hi Patrick,

    actually, in the summer I am at the pool several times every week. Part of my sugar control program. I do swim 50 meters under water and it is very "stressful" (pulse goes WAY up) but does not kill my practice time when I get back home.

    Holding your breath is high tension for the entire breathing apparatus. The mechanism to hold the air in is also the same that causes "grunting" while playing. Swimming under water while holding your breath is surely not "bad", but that is not the same as "good". I prefer NOT holding my breath, rather letting the air out slowly like when snorkeling (which I also like to do - it is excellent for rhythmic breathing and I do have tunes in my head to support the breathing frequency).

    I think that getting good data would require more than anyones (especially my) musing. I have in the past taken my blood pressure at the side of the pool after underwater, crawl, breaststroke and butterfly (I had a bout with high blood pressure due to sleep apnoe). Granted, it is only part of the story and not a fair comparison due to the differing efficiencies. Under water was by far the highest of the batch at 190/130.
     
  2. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Just because the pulse goes up it doesn't necessarily mean that it's a bad kind of body stress - exercising is body stress, but it's also beneficial. In light of the fact that you also seem to have a thing for swimming underwater, that maybe, whether you think it does or not, it's actually beneficial to your trumpet playing and is part of the reason your breath control is as good as it is?
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Don't know. I haven't noticed any difference in my playing in the winter or summer but the nature of the concerts is often not the same. For the most part, increased sensible physical activity does help at several levels. What can be attributed directly to "holding" our breath is a tough call without any data. My gut feeling is that the focus should be on increasing healthy activity. Breathing rhythm is something that I do pay attention to (tunes in my head).

    My general teaching is to "prepare the body for a big breath" and then with proper posture to take the biggest breath possible without "compression". The Circle of Breath exhale starts exactly at the apex of the inhale. I also do this while swimming or bike riding.

    I have no data on "holding" ones breath and for sure a fun day at the beach or pool should not be overshadowed by a ROWUK-GEEK overly intellectual approach to the trumpet. Maybe the doctors here could say something about breathing, carbon dioxide, transfer of oxygen in the lungs while under pressure.

    Like I said, I don't know, but I see no "advantage" for playing the trumpet which does not mean that it is necessarily "bad".
     
  4. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    This was the part I was wondering about
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Coolerdave... the answer is simple... Minimize restriction, maximize volume expansion. Again, as Rowuk noted, swimming is a restrictive process (inward pressure against the chest wall). That pressure comes from below as well, as in sitting down as in so doing, you have your chitlin's pressing up against the diaphragm.
     
  6. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Hi Gman,
    You stated:
    "No, not true... don't mess with the pulmonary doc here.... That provides PEEP which is most important for keeping the alveoli and therefore more surface area open for oxygen exchange. The more oxygen exchange, the more energy you have to play... oops, now every one knows my secrete to playing.
    ----
    Can't argue with that. But as you know, every trumpet player here at one time during their development has made the mistake of taking in little snitches of air while playing without doing a proper exhale. This results in being full of air that lacks oxygen. Your statement wasn't wrong, it just needed a little tweeking to make it even less not wrong. Now if you're taking about PEEP the suger coated chicks with a neat yellow color, then I stand corrected.
    Dr.Mark
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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  8. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    IMO those who excel at freediving, such as natural pearl and conch divers, have over time developed a physique with an enlarged lung capacity. With COPD diagnosed, even SCUBA diving with my daughter is now just a memory.

    Now before I even practice on one of my brass instruments I get a reading on my own O2 meter and if ever below 95%, I'll be spending the next hour with a 2 liters per hour O2 flow from either tank or concentrator.
     
    coolerdave likes this.
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I think the freedivers also reduce body functions to the absolute minimum to stay down as long as possible. That for sure does not "relate" to playing.
     

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