What Cornet to get

Discussion in 'Horns' started by Darktrumpeter, Aug 13, 2004.

  1. Darktrumpeter

    Darktrumpeter Pianissimo User

    79
    0
    Aug 11, 2004
    NJ, USA
    I'm thinking about getting a cornet but do not know what cornet to get. I am looking for a good professional cornet that doesn't cost over $2000. What key should I get the cornet in Bb or C.
     
  2. sparxIII

    sparxIII New Friend

    30
    0
    Nov 1, 2003
    Toronto ON Canada
    what cornet

    A Lawler Bb cornet in raw brass will run you $1975.00US ......... it's a great cornet. I play one every day with a Sparx cornet mouthpiece.

    you can 'link' to the Lawler trumpet web site from www.sparxmusic.com

    Cheers,
    Ted
     
  3. MUSICandCHARACTER

    MUSICandCHARACTER Forte User

    1,140
    2
    Jan 31, 2004
    Newburgh, Indiana
    You didn't mentioned what you plan on primarily using it for. Jazz? Brass Band? Symphonic solos? That would make some difference.

    I can tell you that Ted is right about the Sparx mouthpieces (he maybe a little biased, but I don't sell them so I am not so biased). I have many, many friends who play their cornets with a Sparx. It is a good recommended place to start for a mouthpiece!

    Jim
     
  4. trumpetpimp

    trumpetpimp Piano User

    253
    0
    Dec 6, 2003
    Toronto
    Re: Mouthpieces

    Sparx has made a great cornet mouthpiece by working together with GR but I found the rim was'nt quite for me. If you like the Sparx pieces but find they're missing something in the feel consider having GR put a different rim on a cornet cup and shank.
     
  5. Darktrumpeter

    Darktrumpeter Pianissimo User

    79
    0
    Aug 11, 2004
    NJ, USA
    I am only a junior in high school now but am looking to go into trumpet as my career when I get out of college. My main goal is to try to get into a large ensemble band or orchestra i.e. NY Philharmonics. I am more interested in non-jazz music. I understand that you can't usually make it on just trumpet and I will be needing a cornet and most likely a piccolo trumpet. This is the reason I made this forum in hopes to find a good cornet and work hard on it so I will be pretty good at it before I go into college.
     
  6. Yoder

    Yoder Piano User

    254
    0
    Aug 2, 2004
    Digital Domain
    I don't have cornets yet on my site, but try a ZeuS (that is what I sell.) Goto http://www.zacharymusic.com/ If you get a ZeuS, which I think is the best around for the money, and get it from Zachary Music before I get the Cornet pages up, tell them I referred you so you can get the rebate offer that is happening at my site.
     
  7. Darktrumpeter

    Darktrumpeter Pianissimo User

    79
    0
    Aug 11, 2004
    NJ, USA
    what is the effect of the same cornet with raw brass as apposed to silver, copper, laquer or gold
     
  8. Tootsall

    Tootsall Fortissimo User

    4,529
    8
    Oct 25, 2003
    Yee HAW!
    Well, one manufacturer has some ideas about finish vs sound. Go to http://www.eclipsetrumpets.com and check out what he has to say about "finishes". Of course, some other folks would undoubtedly dispute what Leigh says and claim that it makes no difference. The bottom line is, if you have the chance use your own ears and make your own decision.
     
  9. Yoder

    Yoder Piano User

    254
    0
    Aug 2, 2004
    Digital Domain
    Here is a good source from Conn:

    "Next, the material the instrument is made of. Different metals produce different overtones. Renold Schilke (the man behind the line of instruments carrying his name) did research into this some years ago, putting steel and lead bells on a trumpet and observing the results. Those results were somewhat surprising. The steel bell, when struck produced a beautiful "ping" sound, as you would expect. The lead bell, conversely, didn't "ring" at all. However, when played on a trumpet, the steel bell created so many overtones the results were chaotic when viewed on an oscilloscope. Not practical for musical purposes. The lead bell on the other hand produced almost no overtones at all, making the sound almost "mechanical". Both bells were useless for practical purposes. If you would like to read the entire paper Schilke wrote on this and other subjects, follow this link: Materials and their affect on the acoustics of brass instruments. http://www.dallasmusic.org/schilke/Brass Clinic.html# (You need to go down about six paragraphs to get to the good stuff.) Materials More useful for our purposes is the comparison between brass and various metals such as aluminum, silver, copper, gold and nickel. Aluminum, silver and nickel make a tone "brighter" compared to brass. Gold and copper on the other hand "darken" the tone. The more copper in the brass alloy, the darker the sound is. Hence coprion, and such alloys as "red/rose brass". The cause of these differences lies is in the hardness or inflexibility of the metals. The harder or more inflexible a metal is, the brighter the sound will be, and vice versa."

    It is good reading and goes beyond finishes. 8)
     

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