What determines a trumpet's key?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by hoserb, Jan 6, 2012.

  1. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    I'd wager you didn't pay $400 or less for it, even if pre-owned.
     
  2. shakey

    shakey New Friend

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    What is the price they get for those things?
     
  3. Phil986

    Phil986 Forte User

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    Actually you're right. I paid in the vicinity of 4000 francs (brand new from a store) for it back in 1992, a pretty hefty price but it's a quality instrument. I've seen only a couple of others, never seen one in the US or on e-Bay so I'd say they are not so common. I would not sell mine for $400 that's for sure.
     
  4. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    A trumpet in C with a set of Bb slides is a compromise. One or both of the configurations will have shortcomings, depending on the base design of the horn. Effective length is only part of the equation in having a good playing, in-tune trumpet. If you don't mind a slightly inferior horn (in at least one of the keys), a convertible is a cheaper way to have both a Bb and a C, though. Years ago, I went that route for a while, but eventually bought separate Bb and C trumpets.
     
  5. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    As I can sight transpose from C to Bb, I've just never had a yearning for a C trumpet (or the surplus funds). The Bb is enough of a stew to stir. If anything, I'd think about a Thayer type pop-off to an F from a Bb. What do you think about this Ivan?
     
  6. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Even when transposition is as easy as falling off a log, many times you still want the difference in sound produced by a trumpet in a different key.
     
  7. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Quite possible Dale. I just haven't yet been in the circumstance or occassion where I've found such a necessity.

    Admittedly, I'm a piano music transposer fanatic, in addition to cornet/trumpet, also mellophone in F, and my euphonium. Many boxes of my Mother's and Grandmother's music here. Lots of the 50s pops my late brother and I bought for my Mother. 40s, my oldest brother bought her (that's the big band stuff).

    Thanks but no thanks about burling a log. I've watched, but I'm not going to attempt it myself, especially not now. Luckily, I can still walk some.
     
  8. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    In classical music trumpets in different keys give you the option of having different texture of sound to fit the music. I'll play a D or Eb horn even if it means making the transposition difficult. I like to play Mozart operas on the D thrumpet regardles of the horn it's written for.
     
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    OK Physics boy, since the speed of sound is the distance travelled during a unit of time by a sound wave propagating through an elastic medium, which in dry air is at 20 °C (68 °F), is close to 345 meters per second, what key would a "traditional" Bb trumpet be playing when in Kingtrumpet's bathroom, which is primarily composed of moist methane gas?

    [Hint: You can use the American Chemistry Society's publication on chemical characteristics to make this calculation.]
     
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    No equations needed to answer this question.

    Because "they" [makers of most brands of horn] make more money this way.
     

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