What Do I Listen For When Tuning?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by tedh1951, Sep 26, 2009.

  1. B15M

    B15M Forte User

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    Monroe Ct.
    I don't think a tuner is the answer.

    There are CD's available that play a drone tone and have you play so you can hear Sharp and flat. I think Chase Sanborn (sp?) has a system with a tuner and the CD so you can hear and see what is going on.

    I have been told that I should be able to hear the difference between playing sharp and flat. I have never been able to do it though.
     
  2. RHSbigbluemarchingband

    RHSbigbluemarchingband Mezzo Piano User

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    During marching band, we have to tune by ear all the time, but I personally learned from listening to me and another player, whose in tune, and remembering which way to move the slide depending on the noise, and the beats
     
  3. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Ted,

    I read through your original question several times. Are you asking if the bass (are we talking string bass) plays a G, what note should you play to match it? If this is a regular concert band, I can't imagine why they would have you tuning to a tuba or bass. For real?

    The easiest way to learn to "hear" in tune is to find another similar instrument. 2 trumpets, not a tuba!
     
  4. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    That last one sent before it was finished.

    Anyway, learn to tune to another trumpet, if you are playing a trumpet. Once you get good at that (by the way, even "tone" differences among similar instruments can lead on astray -you have to learn not to perceive the darker sounding trumpet as flat and the bright tone as sharp) try another instrument with about the same tonal frequency -trumpet to clarinet. Then, learn to hear larger differences, like trombone and tuba.
    Steve
     
  5. B15M

    B15M Forte User

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    Monroe Ct.
    Maybe it's something that they teach in wind band conducting. Every community band that I've played with tells us to listen down and they want us to tune to the tuba. I have trouble doing it. It's funny, I'm never asked to in a pro band.
     
  6. rbdeli

    rbdeli Mezzo Piano User

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    CO
    Sort of off the topic. When I listen to student or school bands, the violins always seem to sound the most out of tune. Is this because the violin is really hard to play in tune, or does it have to do with the tonality or acoustics of the instrument? Curious, what you all think.
     
  7. rbdeli

    rbdeli Mezzo Piano User

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    You have an interesting perspective, Rowuk. That doesn't neccessarily mean I disagree.
     
  8. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    The Community Concert Bands, with which I have been involved, regularly and quite formally "tune to the tuba", or bass guitar. It begins by the tuba providing a continuous note while the trombones tune to that note, eventually sustaining that collective note.

    Similarly, and in sequence, the bari, tenor, and alto saxes tune with the tuba as reference, followed by the flutes, clarinets, and finally the trumpets. It seems to me that this relies on the tuba being 'on-song' and that the band is now in tune with the tuba - not necessarilly in tune per se. Stage and Show Bands of my experience tend to encourage individual tuning.

    I seek your collective advice so that I might find the words to encourage our young BD to have a system to set the band up and also be able to explain to the youngsters, in simple terms, what we are trying to achieve.

    This is plainly a different 'silver bullet' to that of the Great Mouthpiece Adventure. Thanks for your comments.
     
  9. SpiritDCI08

    SpiritDCI08 Piano User

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    Feb 11, 2009
    Fort Campbell, KY
    I use a tuner but I don't use the tuner function.
    I set the tuner on the pitch mode so it plays a perfect C to me. I listen to it, then I hum it, I sing it, then I play in. I can hear the waves in the sound when I play with it. If the waves are very slow then I'm flat but if they are fast then I'm sharp. If you can't hear waves then your in tune.
    I do this with the trombones usually in an ensemble. I don't have alot of work with tubas
    .
     
  10. Smithi20

    Smithi20 Pianissimo User

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    I always thought tuning a Bb trumpet to a concert A was asking for trouble! I'll always tune to the piano Bb (my C), often double checking by just pressing the key down noiselessly, playing and hearing that string sing!
     

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