What do you look for in a band???

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trumpetguy27, Oct 10, 2014.

  1. robrtx

    robrtx Mezzo Forte User

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    I think that where you are in the spectrum of; amatuer----semi professional-----professional determines determines a great deal.

    As an amatuer with a day job (well sort of a "day" job) I would look for the following;

    1. a band that plays a musical style/genre that I enjoy
    2. charts that are within my modest means
    3. mature, responsible bandmates that I enjoy being around
    4. a flexible schedule that I can work around my job and other committments ( this one is usually the deal breaker.......)
     
  2. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    The ability to listen and the willingness to make adjustments is huge for any ensemble. This requires curbing one's ego, as does accepting constructive criticism. Being nice is a plus as well.
     
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Simply put: To be able to play with members of an ensemble that hear each other, and communicate with each other such that it enhances then the experience for the audience.
     
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  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Yes, that is what I mean by hearing.... Hearing goes way beyond just listening. Nice description VB.
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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  7. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    I would amend this to: "Simply put: To be able to play with members of an ensemble that hear each other, and communicate with each other such that it enhances the experience for the audience and each other."

    Bold for the new stuff.
     
  8. melza

    melza Pianissimo User

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    It has to be fun and the other band members need to be be as committed. I've come across a few people who would fail to practice their instrument so the rehearsal would be their only practice, that doesn't work and wastes everyone's time. Also reliability.
     
  9. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    there are other considerations --- and since I am about to turn 50 ---- then I also have crunched some numbers, such that ALL female dates must have a heartbeat -- they must be intelligent (at least an IQ over 100, or at intelligent enough to keep up with the many faceted intellectual status of KT --- one other thing, the women KT dates must ALWAYS BE YOUNGER than he is ------- and since the number 50 is almost here, I am NOT OPPOSED to double dating ---- so the numbers work out that I could date 2 - 25 year olds, one for each of my massive muscular arms ----- and that would be a great double date ROFL ROFL ROFL
     
  10. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    trumpetguy27 ----- I am in a community band --- which may be a bit different than what your asking ---- I've been sticking with it for 3 years now, we have skillful people, we have some beginner/intermediate -- we have some "older people" who are losing their skills ------------- one thing I can say, is that we all LOVE music, and we all do our BEST when presented with easy or difficult pieces of music. the group is generally supportive.

    I have never asked to play lead -- the 3 people there have been with the band since it's inception --- 40 years this year --- they still have the skills, and I suppose they have earned their positions -----------------

    I will tell you --- there have been times I thought about QUITTING --- "wondering, what we are accomplishing" --- but playing at a retirement home, where the band outnumbered the audience by 2 to one (our band with 60 members and the audience --- maybe 30 counting the staff members) ------ BUT one older woman, in a wheelchair had her attendant push her over to me as I was packing up my horn ---- the woman could barely speak, but she said "thank you so much for coming here and playing live music for us -- NOBODY does that for us, and this is so special, and meaningful" --- I replied, your welcome, and I will see you next year ---- to which she replied -- "some of us have no next year -- but it's important to live each day to it's fullest, to be happy, and to be thankful for everything" ---------

    OK -- similar events like that have happened in the last 3 years -- at retirement homes, at a "home for the disabled", a hospital for Veterans ----
    my only advice Trumpetguy27 ----- aside from all the money, from a full plate of gigs --- BY ALL MEANS VOLUNTEER YOUR BAND for a concert where people never get a chance to "get out" and see you -------- I don't think I have to explain further
     

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