What do you play when someone asks to hear you play????

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by drac, Mar 29, 2004.

  1. retro23

    retro23 Pianissimo User

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    Pops Plays WC! "Beale Street Blues" seamlessy going into "Yellow Dog Blues" then "Memphis Blues":play:.... then I put the horn away:D
     
  2. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Beverage and food costs excepted, the audiences usually do now pay the expense of listening to copyrighted music played by "professional musicians". This is biggest reason why the admission price or cover charge has now risen so high that even the median payed worker can now seldom afford to go and listen or dance to "live music" being performed as is a factor to be considered in the demise of interest in instrumental music performance worldwide, moreso in this economy.

    Too, this has been a causal factor in the demise of many instrument manufacturers. The rational profit margin is no longer there. The days of a $100.00 professional instrument are long by gone history now in antiquity.
     
  3. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    As I have stated many times on this and other forums, I have not played a gig or put a brass instrument to my lips otherwise since July 2008 and prior to that there had been a 40 year lapse until February 2006. Really, it was mostly while I was in my junor and senior year in high school and during two years of college that I had the most gigs for which I received remuneration. In 2007, I was sounding TAPS quite often and performing in church without fee. However, between 2006 and 2008 I did produce 3 copyright licensed CDs plus 4 Public Domain CDs, one of the latter a 25 song Christmas album and 2 being singles, one copyright licensed God Bless America by Irving Berlin, and the second a public domain, Entry of the Gladiators by Julius Fucik. My copyrighted album Choices is Sold Out and included 10 "pops" such as Stayin' Alive, Stardust, Seventy-Six Trombones and more where I played all parts on multiple brass instruments WITHOUT DRUMS or other external tempo control. Now just wait until I get my full upper denture and I begin my second comeback!
     
  4. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    And IF you (or others) are ever caught, and your "song book" seized / supoenaed as evidence, the criminal and civil penalties, I'd presume would be extremely harsh, even down to forfeit of all your instruments and other assets. Whoops! If your band is known to cross state lines, as I know many do, legitimate and otherwise, Federal jurisdiction is incurred. I'd just say that your 17 years has been the luckiest, because the agents of composers and other law enforcement officers are chasing such infringement of copyright and you'll not know who they are until the warrant / supoena is served upon you. Yes, the composers / lyricists are entitled by law for their due. They did not produce their work for FREE. As I also stated, the truly "professional musician" pays to play.
     
  5. Jfrancis

    Jfrancis Pianissimo User

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    If it's a child, I play the theme to "Sesame Street" with a couple of blues licks for the parents. In a church crowd, "Amazing Grace", or "Lord's Prayer".

    "A Night in Tunisia" falls very well off the valves.

    Then I might improvise a little - KNOW YOUR AUDIENCE
     
  6. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    I'm sure there are contracts for annual performances upon which you report how many times you've / your band / your group played each song annually in public. I really don't know of such being done through the publisher, but I just don't presently believe such is so, especially when I note the copyright notice on the first page of a published song concluded with "Used by Permission". Certainly publishers of sheet music and recording labels do purchase music from composers / lyricists upon which they expect to make a profit on the music they sell. Generally, the purchase of sheet music does not include the copyright license to perform such in public or to re-arrange it. Perhaps bands / groups / "professional musicians" (alluded) should engage the services of a competent copyright attorney and/or incorporate the band / group to avoid personal liability AND without doubt there are are several who do just that. Yep, every viable business now has massive overhead expenses. As John Ruskin stated (paraphrased), "Only the other knows the value of their services.", and as such I won't go into how much a "professional musician" should expect to earn ... but I don't know of many who are so wealthy that music is the only job they work at. Cold hard facts as such are ... and it's much more fun just to enjoy playing your musical instrument(s) and not worry about how much money you earn or who your audience is, if any.
     
  7. I'm definitely going to make sure to get copyright license from now on. It never occurred to me that I needed one, I figured that paying for the chart was enough and that all those copyrights only applied to recorded music not written music. Well I want to be a law abiding citizen so I'm going to do a search to better educate myself:thumbsup:.
     
  8. Aussie Matt

    Aussie Matt Pianissimo User

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    I've got to say, I'd hate to live in a world where a couple of kids playing Christmas Carols at the local shopping centre one December get pulled up by the 'music police' and forced to hand over their hard-earned change because they hadn't paid royalties. That would have to be the quickest way to get a young enthusiastic musician to put down their horn, violin, oboe, kazoo, whatever, and head back to the X-box.
    Don't get me wrong, this is an interesting topic and it's got me thinking (especially about all the gigs I've played as a drummer back in the day!) but surely there are practicalities at play. It probably changes from state to state and country to country too. I know recording is one thing but there should be (?) some leeway for public performance. Ignorance is bliss isn't it!
    For the record, my church pays an annual license fee to the various publishers and we keep a copy of what we play which we submit at regular intervals. Don't ever remember writing anything down at all the pubs though...
     
  9. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Ladies and Gentlemen - have a look at this link if you will APRA|AMCOS : Bringing music creators and consumers together this is the mechanism our Band uses to deal with our responsibilities under the Aussie system (careful, the US and Australian laws are different) - it costs the Band AUD$74 per year.
     
  10. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Said "kids" could play at least 25 Christmas carols as are Public Domain in the U.S. (I've recorded them) and be a big hit to the Christmas shopping audience and possibly any charity they represented. NO, if they chose a copyrighted Christmas song they might be in for an unwelcome surprise. Yep, Rockin' Round the Christmas Tree is a NO NO as is Frosty The Snowman, Silver Bells, It's Beginning To Look A Lot Like Christmas, White Christmas etc. etc.

    Yes, I remember when many members of our high school band volunteered to play with the small brass ensemble of the Salvation Army during their Christmas Kettle fund raising drive. Too, then the kettle was real and a big one and we gathered 'round the flag pole in front of the Post Office where people were then mailing big bundles of Christmas cards. Local restaurants kept us supplied with hot chocolate (which when it dries is a real mess to clean from your instrument). Ususally twice in the evening, that big kettle was full ! Looking about, one could readily count 100 shoppers going in and out of the stores on main street. Now today 3/4 of those stores are defunct and the buildings they were in all but abandoned. Now the best you'll find in many areas of the U.S. is an out of work person paid to tend a little 2 quart kettle as he/she rings a tiny out of tune bell.

    Oh how I liked the Christmas parade then as our high school band marched along main street with our majorettes collecting wrapped toys marked for boys and girls of a certain age. It took a 10 ton construction truck to carry them to distribution points. Those were a wonderful CHRISTMAS memory. Yes, my teeth were still chattering when I went to church on Christmas Eve for the Cantata.
     

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