What exactly do we mean by 'Response'?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Sethoflagos, Nov 24, 2013.

  1. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    If you are counting votes or number of opinion variations then I would answer as VB did, and as Brekelefuw did.

    --bumblebee
     
  2. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Okay, let's drop the problem words.

    Back in the mid-seventies, I tested but couldn't afford, some pro-level Getzen 700s and 900s (in particular, the Eterna Severinsen)

    To this day, I've not come across an instrument that played with such little effort - the notes just seemed to fall out of the bell. No extra air (possibly less) and no fancy mouthpiece (most likely my old student VB 7C)

    And yet I've read on this site that Severinsen's had highish resistance?

    Something's not making sense with these terminologies
     
  3. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    For resistance I always interpreted that as the feeling I get of airflow into the horn -- how much of a rush, or resistance to rush, of air to play a note at my required volume. I think some people might describe a lack of resistance as being more open but they might have their own interpretation for that term. I find only a tenuous correlation between resistance and response using my understandings of these two terms when considering my trumpets. My Strad has a greater resistance than my Recording (to me) but very similar response. My Shires Destino III feels more open (see above) and has to me noticeably better/quicker response. A friend who has tried my Destino has said he feels it takes a lot of air (so less resistance?) but I don't find it's that much more (or perhaps I haven't performed a proper test for that). Bore size is not a guide for me - my Destino III has a slightly smaller bore than the Strad or Recording.

    I believe that mouthpiece choice (which may actually be gap choice) has a bearing on the feeling of "response" too, and maybe a different mouthpiece for different horns might make a difference in this area (once you've settled on your working definition of "response") but I don't usually relish changing mouthpieces. (Perhaps if it is the "gap" which is reason for change then I would consider changing mouthpiece shanks, or even using one of those "gap kits" I read about.)

    Another interpretation of "response" could be "the response in the player when he or she plays a trumpet". When I tried a Bach Artisan I had a pretty good response. When I first tried my Destino III my response was "Wow!" (and still is).

    --bumblebee
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2013
  4. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    I've played on some horns that seemed like they were sucking the air out of me and threatening to pull my face, head and body through behind it, yet their owners could play them beautifully. I recall Tony Scodwell saying that Doc liked horns that had a bit of resistance to blow against, and Doc still pushes huge amounts of air into the horn. Most instruments have a resistance that is easy for most players to handle, and it is extremely common (almost a conventional wisdom sort of thing) that a player who plays on a medium large bore B[SUP]b[/SUP] will prefer a large bore C.

    I do like Brekelefuw's response test.
     
  5. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Brekelefuw's and yours +1

    So I'll go for the large bore C (described as 'medium resistance')

    Bumblebee's definition of 'resistance' seems closer to what engineers call 'reactance' - and is the only way I can reconcile it with Ivan's comments (and blog article he did a while ago) - essentially how strongly the instrument 'blows' back at you. Previously, I'd thought of it more in terms of Harrelson's 'efficiency' (how much work per decibel sort of thing).
     
  6. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    Seth,


    leaving all the bumf and theory aside, I gather that you want a good solid C trumpet that combines a good classical sound with ease of playing. If you are into rotary trumpets at all, you can't go wrong with a Votruba of Vienna, or a Dowids from Munich. These, however, will set you back at least 3,000 quid (the Dowids possibly more), and you will wait for them quite some time. If you want something in a piston line, go for the Stomvi Elite. Superb workmanship and durability, excellent response, wonderful sound that can be shaped as you like it. I've done almost every variety of orchestral playing with mine - from "Freisch├╝tz" (where you need a dark, almost Flugelhorny sound) to Wagner operas (where projection is key) to showtunes where you're required to get a swing sound... the Stomvi Elite does everything I ask... combined with the advantages of the Stomvi Mouthpiece System, I've got everything covered.
     
  7. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Not in my character I'm afraid. If I wanted to live in a fog I'd have stayed in the UK ;-)
     
  8. bigtiny

    bigtiny Mezzo Forte User

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    If it feels like you're trying to make a musical sound come out of a concrete block, then
    you're getting no response. If you effortlessly blow golden tinges of aural orgasmic
    goodness, then the horn is reponding.

    bigtiny
     

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