What is more rewarding to play classical or jazz?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by beginner, Jun 27, 2013.

  1. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    I for one separate songs that are classic from those I consider classical vis I can pick songs from many genres as are "classic' of that genre, yet not what I'd deem "classical". Many times a concerto is only a showpiece part of a much larger work. Many of us are familiar with Giuseppe Verdi's Triumphal March from his opera Aida, that is, if we graduated from some academic institutions., Still, I'll deem this song "classic" and that from which it was extricated "classical". For sure, it is a march, but not intended for the performers to be marching in the parade of exodus, their diplomas or certificates of accomplishment in hand. I suppose I could go on and on with such, but I'll not leave this expounding without mention of God Bless America, White Christmas, and thousands of others that I refer to as classic, yet not classical albeit they can also be categorized otherwise. Seems simplest just to say they are what they are in the ear of the beholder. Want to play them with a trumpet, do it. Want to play them with a violin or piano ... do it. Want to walk down the aisle to other than a recognized march ... do it. Play it because you like it ... that's the best! True, it's nicer if you're paid to paid to play it, and sadly that isn't always the reward, with those rare exceptions.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2013
  2. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    So then you would agree with this genre of classical music right?

    Keeping the African American classical music alive | Eddie Brookshire Quintet

    See, you speak from a "classical" viewpoint based on European values. This interview with an experienced jazz professor at the University of Dayton, I read, as blurring the division between classical or jazz. Right?
     
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Oh what the heck lets get to the real answer of: What is more rewarding to play classical or jazz?

    Which ever one wins you the heart of that pretty girl! or good looking guy!
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I think that this thread has gone about as far as it can go.

    I think that it is cool when music can get reactions from crap to ho-hum to OK, to commendable. The broad spread is really what "art forms" are all about to me. What bothers me is indignance when someone DOESN'T like something. I mean like come on, why does a trumpet forum have to be strangled into "considerate" uplifting" or whatever. I do not consider "sh**" to be R-rated. Vulgar, yes, my choice - not so often. I am also not alone - Websters is G rated and goes into great detail:
    Shit - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary

    Of special note:
    Origin of SHIT

    alteration of earlier shite, from Middle English shiten, from Old English -scītan; akin to Old High German scīzan to defecate and probably to Old English scēadan to separate — more at shed*
    First Known Use: 14th century

    Seems to me that most jazz musicians spend a lot of time "shedding". Now we know that there is a common denominator!


    I think that it takes more maturity to take a "negative" stand than to swim along.


    To put this into perspective however: there have always been "technical" and "musical" players as well as just about every combination in between.

    At the end of the day, the internet keeps filling up with ever more "marginal" content. Why don't the really informed take the opportunity and let the rest know what we would do with the soloist if he was "our" student. For those with no practical "jazz teaching" experience, don't just blog garbage - sit back and enjoy the ride. Many times we can learn more when we have our system switched to receive instead of transmit.
     
  5. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    I look at and listen to all genres using European values. That's what I've been trained to do. I did dabble in a small combo and learned enough to sightread and improvise well enough to not embarrass myself or others when soloing, and when soloing my ideas were just that--my ideas. In other words, even though I look at music through European lenses I still respect good jazz musicians. Besides, jazz has its roots in classical music.

    What confuses the issue most is the cognitive distortion that makes for "all or nothing" or "black and white" thinking in the OP's question. All music is either 100% classical or 100% jazz as implied in the question. What about pop and rock? Techno?
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Being a disciple more recently of Brother Brookshire, I am not sure he would agree that jazz has its roots in classical music. Much of the history of jazz details its roots in America (it is one of two original American art forms) originating out of the center of the jazz capital of the world, New Orleans. It is the music, steeped in the roots of communication with rhythm between folks with their origins from the African Continent. This communication was brought to our Continent by slave ships, who emptied their cargo and enslaved musicians at the port of New Orleans. European influence at this point would have only been as the people who owned the boats.

    As the art form of the slaves took hold in our American culture, European instruments became blended into the African-American art form... that is the beauty of the culture of African-American Classical music, to blend other ethnic contributions into the genre. No, I believe jazz (African-American Classical music) has it roots deep from the heart of Africa, and I am grateful for that, just as I am equally grateful that classical music had its roots established deep in from the heart of Europe. When you blend the two, you have an amazingly fabulous art form.
     
  7. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Starting in 1808 the importation of slaves was banned, and by the time jazz began, at least two generations had been born and bred in the USA. By the time Jazz began there was plenty of exposure to European music, the I IV I V I chord progression came from Europe as did the inégal style of playing, major influences in Jazz. The call and response and polyrhythm did come from Africa.

    I see Jazz as a subset of classical.
     
  8. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    of course -- I just wanted to Quote Rowuk --- as we have all missed him on TM.

    I still say, it is mostly about the audience ((all things being said, if you sit in your practice room and enjoy one form of music over the other -- and never share it, that is your business)) --- but if you can appeal to an Audience ((and you can with either Classical or Jazz)) and get them involved, then you have something. In which case, it is mostly likey that you will inspire some YOUNG person to take up music ----------------after all, I believe most of us on TM, started that way!!!! --- We were inspired by someone playing some form of music, and we WANTED to play, and did!!!!
     
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    True enough, but your initial comment was:

    The roots of African-American Classical Music predates 1808 by quit a bit. I believe jazz had it's own independent evolution, that eventually did incorporate European influence and likely prior to the 1808 date you mention above. The term Jazz actually did not come about until the early part of last century and was a term derived from romantic couples involving an act of intimacy.
     
  10. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Yeah, now I know why I had older brothers taking band, and though I enjoyed my Mother's and her Mother's piano and organ music and her Father's fiddling, and my other Grandmother's mandolin and voice. I just never got into them. Both my brothers were brass players!
     

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