What is slotting?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Melodious Thunk, Feb 2, 2009.

  1. Bear

    Bear Forte User

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    I would think not. If the slotting is loose, it is a lot harder to manipulate the sound. Again, try bending notes on a loose horn and a tight horn (in terms of slotting) and see which fits better for you. I would think it'd be the tighter one as you'd have more control over what you'd be able to do.... I hope all that makes sense.
     
  2. lovevixen555

    lovevixen555 Banned

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    ROWUK what you said is very true in most reguards. I almost brought $4000+ trumpets into the mix but decided to keep them out. THis is why I focused my responce on affordable!!! If money is no object then you can usualy eat your cake and have it too. That is why I made my refrences very loose and vage with lot's of wiggle room. I am preety sure I could hand Wynton an Eastman 420 and he could make it sing but he is not the norm!LOL I am glad he is not either because I would not want to have to see that many people make it look so easy all the time!!!LOL
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    just for the record, the most "efficient" horn/mouthpiece combo I have ever played was a Xeno with a Schilke 14A4A. That is not what I want to sound like, but the physics really lined up. You don't need 10 grand to find efficiency.

    The problem with increasing the efficiency of a horn with heavy caps or other pimp stuff is that the intonation often goes south, so players get the mouthpiece throat bored out - losing the efficiency but making it less work to fight the horn back into being in tune. My experience is that most horns are best in their original "balanced" state.
     
  4. Melodious Thunk

    Melodious Thunk Pianissimo User

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    So according to what I've just read... slotting can be somewhat controlled by switching out the mouthpiece? I am a little confused, as to whether good slotting is desirable or not!?!
     
  5. lovevixen555

    lovevixen555 Banned

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    One thing I like about older horns is that they often have cast valve engines which put's the mass where you want it to begin with. Many of the new designs today have tubular construction which is very light and cheap from a supply stand point but I think it hurts the sound. In the end they have to add the weight someplace to make up for what is missing fromt he valve engine.. Wait till you see my new toy!!! She is a beautiful gem!!! She old but looks like new!!
     
  6. Bear

    Bear Forte User

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    Please don't try to think too much about it. Just find a horn that works for you and get in the woodshed! Good slotting is desireable for some situations (most in my case), however, some people do like loose horns. Again, don't try to think too much about it. Just blow!

    Switching mouthpieces can change everything pretty much... your SOUND, range, articulation, endurance, etc.

    DISCLAIMER: Please don't go on a mpc safari now either! LOL. The most profitable thing one can do is get in the woodshed.
     
  7. Melodious Thunk

    Melodious Thunk Pianissimo User

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    I am just starting out and have an old horn, so that's what I'll be playing until I am good enough to be able to tell the "differences in horns". I was just curious about slotting.
     

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