What is the secret

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by gunshowtickets, Mar 4, 2016.

  1. gunshowtickets

    gunshowtickets Forte User

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    I've been putting in time, but I'm an efficiency nerd.
    Perfect practice makes perfect, I figured axin the pros from the get-go would steepen the learning curve.
    I find I get the most cornet-y sound when my mind is elsewhere, after the warm-ups, etudes, transposition exercises, and longtones and i'm just playing.

    You dog, our comm band director told me he wanted to play Hammersmith for our next concert. Only I and a second part player even have cornets.
     
  2. Bochawa!!!

    Bochawa!!! Forte User

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    Wow. Thanks for the memory! My dad is a piper and Amazing Grace hit the charts right about the time I first played a cornet or trumpet. The B side of Amazing Grace was Cornet Carillon. Between my dad and I we pretty much wore out that 45 in short order. During the summer of '81 I got to play Cornet Carillon, same arrangement, with the Band of the Ceremonial Changing of the Guard in Ottawa, although we played it on our issued Bach 37's. Here it is for those who may be young enough to have missed it . . .

    It doesn't start until about 0:30

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YmFzaFGzm44

    Now, imagine me one year later when I heard Get It On for the first time. :shock: Same thing, sort of! :cool:
     
  3. True Tone

    True Tone Piano User

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    Well that's similar to my community band's problem, off the top of my head only 3 of them have cornets, and being a woodwind I don't really have much authority to get some of them to play on cornets. Still a good band though.
     
  4. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Ronald Binge was I guess our Leroy Anderson of the '50s and '60s and a big part of the childhood musical backdrop of our post-war generation in Britain (the Mantovani sound, Elizabethan Serenade, Sailing By, The Watermill etc.)

    Google tells me that he originally scored Cornet Carillon for cornet trio with accompanying military band, but it was popular on the brass band concert circuit around 1970 as well, and that's how I remember it.

    Interesting to compare with this later recording by the Dyke.

     
  5. Bochawa!!!

    Bochawa!!! Forte User

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    As Kenneth J. Alford was our Sousa. The Dyke recording is a bit cleaner and no woodwinds. A good listen. Thanks.
     
  6. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    As a military bandsman and having played a lot of marches, I much prefer Alford's marches to Sousa's. Sousa's are maybe a bit more bombastic, but they just don't have the same lyric quality that Alford's marches do. "Colonel Bogey" and "Army of Denial" are two of my favorite marches, and they rank right up there with "British Apes," which is probably my favorite march of all time.

    For that matter though, my favorite Sousa marches are not the typical marches that people think of. I prefer "El Capitan" and "Fairest of the Fair" to the more common "Star and Stripes Forever," "Washington Post," "Liberty Bell" or "Sempre Fidelis."
     
  7. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Army of the Nile, I get, but British Apes? New one on me. Enlighten us, Patrick. :-)
     
  8. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Sorry - these are army band nicknames for some of these marches - "British Apes" is "British Eighth" by Alonzo Elliot.

    I prefer this march at the slower, more stately British tempo. Even this is borderline too fast. I hear this played at "standard" Sousa march tempo by American bands, and it's just gross IMO. This one is supposed to be stately and lyrical, or at least that's my opinion on it. :-)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hN4AUUrvEg4
     
  9. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Fair enough. After all, we've been calling yours Sam Perfidious, Lavatories Smell etc for a few generations. ;-)
     
  10. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    We don't limit it to British Marches - we call The Thunderer, "The ThundeReReReR." "Stars and Stripes Forever" is sometimes referred to as "Scars and Gripes Forever," and "The Liberty Bell" becomes "Liberty Hell."
     

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