What is the secret

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by gunshowtickets, Mar 4, 2016.

  1. gsmonks

    gsmonks Piano User

    I should perhaps add that the top cornet players were individuals, not band members, who spent their time touring, teaching, competing, writing method books, and very often played as guest soloists. But for the most part, they were touring soloists. They had fans and followings, and their followers tried to get their hands on the same music and the same instruments.

    In terms of performance practice, it has to be said that the individual players driving the scene did not want to sound just like everyone else. If you were to go looking for that "classic cornet sound" amongst the top players during the heyday of the cornet, you would be disappointed, because the players themselves were all trying to distinguish themselves from one another, mostly by specialising at something- tonguing, change of register, playing lyrically, playing loudly, playing high, playing extremely fast, exploring various styles.

    Perhaps you guys haven't seen the equipment they were using back then? You should see old collections of cornet mouthpieces. Huge, tiny, extremely deep, extremely shallow, V-cup, parabolic cup, C cup, thin rim, round rim (an extreme chop-killer), wide rim, extremely wide rim, flat rim, you name it.
     
  2. gsmonks

    gsmonks Piano User

    Also- something I keep forgetting to mention- the perception of a "classic" cornet or "classic anything" sound is a matter of nostalgia, and nostalgia is always wrong.

    For example, if this were 1845, these would be no nostalgic mention of a "classic" cornet sound because it hadn't been around long enough for such a perception to exist. Talk of a "classic" anything means that it happened at some time in the past.

    In the US, that "classic" cornet sound has been gone for so long that there is no one today to remember it.

    (Why does that remind me of the opening of the Lord Of The Rings movie . . . ?)

    It was the same type of sound that was heard in the UK and everywhere else the cornet found itself back then. So ca 1900, no matter where you lived, you might have said, "That old cornet sound." Cornopeans and circular valved post horns were around back then in both the US and the UK, and they have that "old cornet sound". In fact, in a couple US museums, I've seen both circular (French) post horns in low keys (such as F and Eb), and clapper (keyed) post horns, from the days of keyed brass.
     
  3. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    I learned to play a borrowed reproduction Eb keyed bugle a number of years ago. It's amazing how much easier some of the old Eb literature was on it, such as Wood Up Quickstep. Anyway, it had had a very unique sound. Unfortunately, the owner traded it for an original Bb keyed bugle and I couldn't play it due to the increased distance between the keys and the lack of any saddles to aid in holding it. I didn't want to spend the bucks on one of my own, so thus ended my keyed bugle career. Ned Kendall had nothing to worry about, though...:D
     
  4. gsmonks

    gsmonks Piano User

    I'm hoping the Chinese will start making affordable knock-off's of keyed bugles in Eb and C/Bb. Voigt Brass make keyed bugles, but they're $5000 a crack!

    I know what you mean about the literature. It's the same when playing ophicleide. You get one, and all of a sudden, everything is right where it's supposed to be. It's like the difference between using a mellophone and a French horn to play the same music. You can do it, but it's hard on the chops.

    I like the new Chinese-made Wessex ophicleide. It's affordable, and a good player.

    voigt-brass online shop - Klappenfl├╝gelhorn in Es

    Bb Ophicleide | www.wessex-tubas.com
     
  5. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Yeah, the one I learned to play was made by Robb Stewart. It was a very nice instrument.
     
  6. gsmonks

    gsmonks Piano User

    Robb makes very nice horns. I wish someone with deep pockets would come along an order a lot of keyed bugles from him, along with quinticlaves, ophicleides, and monstre ophicleides.

    He did tell me that anyone who makes saxes has the right tool-set for making keyed brass. Like so many things, though, it's the price-tag.
     
  7. gsmonks

    gsmonks Piano User

    Here is the original British brass band sound. This is the Wallace Collection of instruments that belonged to one of the original British brass bands.

    What you're hearing here are cornopeans, not cornets. Cornopeans have that "classic" cornet sound everyone is looking for. There is one for sale on eBay right now, and there are quite a number for sale on various websites, ranging from $400 to $1000, in everything from good players to salvageable condition to wall-hangers.

    The guy playing the triplets at the end is John Wallace, on an 1830's vintage cornopean.

    Zampa Overture Uploaded by gsmonks at Your Listen
     

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