What kind of trumpet gigs are out there?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by nestbeast, May 5, 2010.

  1. Pete Anderson

    Pete Anderson Pianissimo User

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    Feb 27, 2008
    Yeah, this is what I was worried about. "License maintenance", lol, that's a load of BS. The term doesn't even make sense really. If it was really "license maintenance", he should be charging you for every song you play that isn't original, not just ones that you use a back track for. He's just trying to squeeze extra money out of you. Maybe he feels justified since you don't have a band to share the money with, but that term is 100% bogus.

    If they had called it a "single performer fee" then I would say, "that's lame, but okay...". But calling it a "license maintenance fee" is downright sleazy. They're clearly just trying to squeeze a few extra bucks out of people who don't know any better or who aren't in a position to negotiate.

    I'm pretty sure it's legal for them to charge you whatever the want as long as you agree to it beforehand. If they spring it on you afterwards then it might be time to get the union involved...


    I'm kind of surprised that people are getting away with this. It ought to hurt their reputation, since anybody who knows anything is going to see right through it as a completely BS "fee" (this is probably why the big/respectable places aren't doing it to you). But I guess if you refuse to play because of it, there are plenty of other people they could hire... "The business side of music sucks" :dontknow:

    But the more you know, the better you can avoid being taken advantage of.
     
  2. B15M

    B15M Forte User

    2,459
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    Dec 30, 2003
    Monroe Ct.
    I would find the best local community band and join it. This will be your only "for free" thing. When you go around playing for free, people will constantly call you, "for free"

    The community band will be kind of a home base that lets you play with others and keep your lip up. You could get a paying gig here and there from the band too.

    Get a web site with clips of you playing.

    Google swing band and put in your state. Send the band an email with a link to your site and ask to sub.

    Join the union. It's not that big of an investment. Play for the contractor and you should get some summer jobs. They are always short for trumpets for parades. Play well and they will call again.

    Get a student or two. I don't know why but people seem to like it when you say that you teach. I have 3 students and I enjoy teaching them. I don't want any more.

    If there are other trumpet players that are doing work, call them and introduce yourself. I get a lot of jobs from other trumpet players that can't take the job or need a sub.

    Good luck.
     
  3. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
    Pete sez:
    I'm pretty sure it's legal for them to charge you whatever the want as long as you agree to it beforehand. If they spring it on you afterwards then it might be time to get the union involved...
    -----------
    Thanks for the head up on the terminology. Of course its always hard to argue with the person who is giving you the money once the gig is over. Gigs are often sealed with just a hand shake and not a written contract. I'll have my friend (a lawyer) to check on this or at least head me in the direction so I can investigate it. My guess is that its probably legal to off set the cost to the musician. I just hope it does not become standard practice. If it does, I'll have to raise my price accordingly.
    As for the Union? In my area, I've yet to see their worth when compared to the dues paid. There was a time when they made a difference on the music scene in my area (north central WV, western PA, eastern Ohio). Nowdays, I question the Union's power to make things happen for the worker when compared to the 1950's to the 1980's.
     
  4. Pete Anderson

    Pete Anderson Pianissimo User

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    Feb 27, 2008
    I think basically anything goes, so long as both parties agree to it. I mean, you still see breakage clauses in recording contracts (back in the day of 78's, a large percentage of records broke before getting to retail and that would be taken out of the artist's pay... Today everything is CDs or electronic and breakage is nonexistant, yet people will still try to add "breakage clauses" to contracts just to squeeze a few extra dollars out of the artist who either doesn't know better or is just so excited to be getting a record deal that they don't read the contract thoroughly enough...).

    If sleazy bar owners are pulling crap like this on you after you agree to a price, maybe it would be a good idea to get something in writing ahead of time.


    (Sorry that we're totally off-topic to the thread here, but I think this has been a productive discussion...)
     

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